Susan Collins – ME

Current Position: US Senator since 1997
Affiliation: Republican
Candidate: 2021 US Senator
Former Position(s): US Senator

Other Positions:  
Chair, Subcommittee on Transportation, Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies

Quotes: 
Cyber attacks & intrusions give our adversaries the opportunity to gather intelligence, steal intellectual property, & harm critical infrastructure. I joined @MarkWarner & @SenRubioPress in introducing a bill to help reduce cyber threats.

Featured Video: 
Republican Sen. Collins on why she voted to convict | Second Trump impeachment trial

Source: Government page

U.S. Senators Susan Collins (R-ME) and Bob Casey (D-PA) introduced the Prescription Drug Pricing Dashboard Act, bipartisan legislation that would ensure information about the price of prescription drugs is readily available. Their bill would improve transparency and help lower costs by requiring consistently updated information to be posted on the Drug Spending Dashboards at the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services.

“Millions of Americans are struggling with the high cost of prescription drugs, making it more and more difficult for them to access the treatments they require.  This problem particularly affects our seniors, 90 percent of whom take at least one prescription drug,” said Senator Collins. “Our bipartisan legislation would help reduce the cost of medications by shedding light on the opaque pricing information on prescription drugs offered under Medicare and Medicaid.”

Summary

Current Position: US Senator since 1997
Affiliation: Republican
Candidate: 2021 US Senator
Former Position(s): US Senator

Other Positions:  
Chair, Subcommittee on Transportation, Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies

Quotes: 
Cyber attacks & intrusions give our adversaries the opportunity to gather intelligence, steal intellectual property, & harm critical infrastructure. I joined @MarkWarner & @SenRubioPress in introducing a bill to help reduce cyber threats.

Featured Video: 
Republican Sen. Collins on why she voted to convict | Second Trump impeachment trial

Source: Government page

News

U.S. Senators Susan Collins (R-ME) and Bob Casey (D-PA) introduced the Prescription Drug Pricing Dashboard Act, bipartisan legislation that would ensure information about the price of prescription drugs is readily available. Their bill would improve transparency and help lower costs by requiring consistently updated information to be posted on the Drug Spending Dashboards at the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services.

“Millions of Americans are struggling with the high cost of prescription drugs, making it more and more difficult for them to access the treatments they require.  This problem particularly affects our seniors, 90 percent of whom take at least one prescription drug,” said Senator Collins. “Our bipartisan legislation would help reduce the cost of medications by shedding light on the opaque pricing information on prescription drugs offered under Medicare and Medicaid.”

Twitter

About

Susan Collins

Source: Government page

When people in Washington want to solve a problem, they turn to the senior United States Senator from Maine, Susan Collins. First elected in 1996, Senator Collins has earned a national reputation as an effective legislator who works across party lines to seek consensus on our nation’s most important issues. For the past six consecutive years, Senator Collins has ranked as the most bipartisan member of the U.S. Senate by the Lugar Center and Georgetown University.

Senator Collins ranks twelfth in Senate seniority and is the most senior Republican woman.  She chairs the Senate Aging Committee and the Transportation, Housing, and Urban Development Appropriations Subcommittee.  She also serves on the Intelligence Committee as well as the Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee. Known for her Maine work ethic, Senator Collins has never missed a vote in her 23 years in office.  In June 2019, she cast her 7,000th consecutive roll call vote.  She holds the longest perfect voting record in the history of the U.S. Senate.

 

Senator Collins is recognized as skillful legislator, which is one reason why Elle magazine named her one of the most powerful women in Washington.  Her record demonstrates significant legislative accomplishments in such critical areas as homeland security, national defense, disaster response, education, business development, health care, and issues of particular interest to our nation’s seniors.  Along with Senator Joe Lieberman, Senator Collins authored a major overhaul of our nation’s intelligence community after the September 11th attacks and also led the successful effort to repeal the discriminatory “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” law that prohibited gay and lesbian Americans from serving openly in the military.  Senator Collins is the founder of the Common Sense Coalition, a bipartisan group of senators who wrote the framework of the plan that ended the 16-day government shutdown in October 2013 as well as the shutdown in February 2018.

Senator Collins has had a long-standing interest in health care. In 1997, she founded the Senate Diabetes Caucus and has led the effort to more than triple federal funding for diabetes research. As the founder and co-chair of the Congressional Task Force on Alzheimer’s Disease, she has worked to increase funding for Alzheimer’s research and to strengthen support for family caregivers.  She is also a tireless advocate for education and has visited and read to children at hundreds of hundreds of schools across Maine.  A champion for America’s small businesses, Senator Collins is proud of the 100 percent rating she receives from the National Federation of Independent Business, our nation’s leading small business organization.

Constituent service has always been one of Senator Collins’ top priorities. During her time in the Senate, she has helped tens of thousands of Mainers resolve issues with federal agencies at six constituent service centers throughout Maine.

Senator Collins was born December 7, 1952, and raised in Caribou, Maine, where her family runs a fifth-generation lumber business, founded by her ancestors in 1844.  A Phi Beta Kappa graduate of St. Lawrence University, she is married to Thomas A. Daffron and resides in Bangor, Maine.

Committees

  • Committee on Appropriations
    • Subcommittee on Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies
    • Subcommittee on Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies
    • Subcommittee on Defense
    • Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development
    • Subcommittee on Military Construction, Veterans Affairs, and Related Agencies
    • Subcommittee on Transportation, Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies (Chair)
  • Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions
    • Subcommittee on Primary Health and Aging
  • Select Committee on Intelligence
  • Special Committee on Aging

Caucuses

  • Afterschool Caucuses
  • Republican Main Street Partnership

Sponsored Legislation

CONGRESS.GOV 

Offices

Washington DC

413 Dirksen Senate Office Building
Washington, DC 20510
Main: (202)224-2523
Fax: (202)224-2693

Augusta ME

68 Sewall Street, Room 507
Augusta, ME 04330
Main: (207) 622-8414
Serving: Kennebec, Knox, Lincoln, Somerset Counties

 

Experience

Work Experience

Education

  • Bachelor
    St. Lawrence University

Contact

Email:

Offices

Augusta
68 Sewall Street, Room 507
Augusta, ME 04330
Phone: (207) 622-8414

Bangor
202 Harlow Street, Room 20100
Bangor, ME 04401
Phone: (207) 945-0417

Biddeford
160 Main Street
Biddeford, ME 04005
Phone: (207) 283-1101

Caribou
25 Sweden Street, Suite A
Caribou, ME 04736
Phone: (207) 493-7873

Lewiston
55 Lisbon Street
Lewiston, ME 04240
Phone: (207) 784-6969

Web

Government Page, Twitter, YouTube, Facebook

Politics

Source: none

Campaign Finance

Open Secrets

Voting Record

Vote Smart

Search

Google

Wikipedia Entry

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Recent Elections

2014 US Senator

Susan Collins (R)413,50567%
Shenna Bellows (D)190,25430.8%
TOTAL603,759

Source: Ballotpedia

Finances

COLLINS, SUSAN M has run in 3 races for public office, winning 1 of them. The candidate has raised a total of $17,836,904.

Source: Follow the Money

Committees

Committees

Committee on Appropriations
   The House Committee on Appropriations — comprised of 30 Democrats and 23 Republicans and organized into 12 subcommittees — is responsible for funding the federal government’s vital activities to keep the United States safe, strong, and moving forward.
Committee on Aging
   This committee ensures that older adults, especially the growing numbers of older women and minorities, receive APA’s attention by working toward the optimal development of older adults, expanding the scientific understanding of adult development and aging, expanding the delivery of appropriate psychological services to older persons and more.
Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions
   The committee began in 1869 as the Committee on Education and in 1884 through the mid-1900s it was known as the Education and Labor Committee. In 1999, then Chairman James Jeffords of Vermont, worked to officially name it the Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP) Committee.

Today the Committee is led by Lamar Alexander (R-TN) and Ranking Member Patty Murray (D-WA) and is comprised of 22 Senators; 12 Republicans and 10 Democrats. Under their leadership, the Committee is composed of three subcommittees, which have a broad jurisdiction over our country’s health care, education, employment and retirement policies.
Committee on Intelligence
   The United States Senate Select Committee on Intelligence (sometimes referred to as the Intelligence Committee or SSCI) is dedicated to overseeing the United States Intelligence Community—the agencies and bureaus of the federal government of the United States who provide information and analysis for leaders of the executive and legislative branches.

Voting Record

See: Vote Smart

Issues

Economy

Jobs and the Economy

Mainers are resilient. Along with the rest of the country, however, too many Mainers continue to struggle in this tough economy. Senator Collins believes that putting people back to work is the key to improving our economic recovery and should remain our number one goal. With this goal in mind, Senator Collins has offered or supported legislation aimed at providing tax relief, cutting red tape, and investing in a 21st century workforce.

Education

Education

Senator Collins has a strong record of supporting education at all levels, including promoting early childhood education; improving our public school system for kindergarten through 12th grade; and working to increase the affordability of higher education. As a member of the Senate Appropriations and the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committees, Senator Collins will continue to work to ensure that Congress provides robust funding and targeted legislation for the most effective educational programs aimed at helping teachers and students.

Senator Collins has made engaging with Maine’s students and faculty a top priority, visiting nearly 200 schools during her time as a Senator.

Environment

Energy and Environment

From tourism and recreation, to working forests, and fishing and agricultural industries, there is no doubt that Maine’s economy is inextricably linked to the environment. Maine’s greatest treasure is its natural beauty, and Senator Collins remains committed to advancing reasonable and effective policies in the U.S. Senate to protect the environment.

Throughout her time in the U.S. Senate, Senator Collins has worked to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, spur the creation of green energy jobs, and reduce our dangerous dependence on foreign oil – while retaining important American manufacturing jobs.  High costs of energy are burdensome to Maine families, truck drivers, farmers, fishermen, schools, small businesses, mills, and factories.  Nearly 80 percent of the homes in our state rely on heating oil, leaving Maine families extremely vulnerable to high crude oil prices.

Health Care

Health Care

There is no question that our nation’s health care system requires substantial reform. The status quo of soaring health care costs, struggling families, and health care provider shortages across Maine and the nation is unacceptable. Senator Collins frequently works with her colleagues on both sides of the aisle to address these and other important issues facing our nation such as improved mental health care, drug treatment programs, supporting America’s caregivers, and nutrition programs.

As a native to northern Maine, Senator Collins understands the specific challenges that rural communities face for medical care. Throughout her time in the Senate, Senator Collins has consistently supported programs to expand access to and improve the health care system, particularly for citizens living in rural areas.

As a freshman legislator, Senator Collins founded the Senate Diabetes Caucus and has since led the effort to more than triple federal funding for diabetes research.

Infrastructure

Transportation

Senator Collins recognizes the importance of restoring and improving our nation’s crumbling roads, bridges, and other critical infrastructure.  As the Chairman of the Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Transportation and Housing and Urban Development, Senator Collins has the unique ability to help establish our nation’s transportation priorities, while working to help ensure that Maine’s needs are addressed. She has provided strong funding for transportation projects nationwide and represented a thoughtful approach to infrastructure investment. Senator Collins has also long been a leader in efforts to end runaway and youth homelessness.

Safety

Defense and National Security

As a member of the Senate Appropriations Committee and the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, Senator Collins holds a key position in Congress and has the important responsibility of overseeing and shaping national security issues of importance to both Maine and the United States. Senator Collins has fought for, and secured, provisions in annual defense authorization and funding bills that support work at Bath Iron Works, Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, the University of Maine, Saco Defense, Pratt & Whitney, and other companies important to the Maine economy.

Social Security

Senior Issues

As the Chairman of the Senate Special Committee on Aging, Senator Collins’ priorities include retirement security, highlighting the importance of biomedical research on diseases like Alzheimer’s and diabetes, and scams targeting seniors.

As the Senate Co-Chair of the Congressional Alzheimer’s Task Force, the Senator is particularly committed to putting an end to Alzheimer’s disease, which has had such a devastating effect on 5.2 million Americans and their families.

 

Veterans

Veterans

Today, nearly 22 million Americans hold the distinguished title of Veteran, and more than 127,000 of those individuals live in our great State of Maine. As the daughter of a World War II Purple Heart recipient, Senator Collins learned first-hand of the sacrifice that these heroes and their families make to advance the cause of freedom. Fighting on behalf of our nation’s Veterans, Senator Collins has worked to support the needs of Veterans nationwide by protecting access to rural health care, holding the Department of Veterans Affairs accountable in the wake of scandal, and expediting the process for disabled veterans to get the services they need.

X
Angus KingAngus King – ME

Current Position: US Senator since 2013
Affiliation: Other
Former Position(s): Governor from 1995 – 2003

Other Positions:  
Chair, Subcommittee on Strategic Forces
Chair, Subcommittee on National Parks

Quotes: 
U.S. water systems are fundamental to everyday American life – but like our pipelines and our food supply, they are vulnerable to dangerous cyberattacks. We must bolster the cybersecurity of all our critical infrastructure.

Featured Video: 
Full Angus King: In Many States, Being An Independent Is ‘Unthinkable’ | MTP Daily | MSNBC

Today, U.S Senator Angus King Jr. (I-Maine), a member of the Senate Rules Committee, joined seven of his Senate colleagues to introduce the Freedom to Vote Act, legislation to improve access to the ballot for Americans and advance common-sense election integrity reforms. The legislation – which incorporates many crucial reforms from prior bills – reflects feedback that state and local election officials made in recent months to ensure the local authorities directly responsible for implementing reforms are able to do so effectively. It also elevates the voices of American voters by ending partisan gerrymandering and helping to eliminate the undue influence of secret money in our elections.

“Any threat to the democratic process is a threat to democracy itself,” said Senator King. “In the face of state-level threats that undercut the fundamental right to vote for millions of Americans, we must act now to protect our democracy. Our bill would set commonsense minimum standards to ensure that no state infringes upon its citizens’ right to vote and confront widespread anti-democratic practices such as partisan gerrymandering and dark money spending. Free, fair and open elections are the backbone of our national commitment to government of the people, by the people, and for the people – and through this legislation, we will do our part to pass this experiment in self-government on to the next generation of Americans.”

Summary

Current Position: US Senator since 2013
Affiliation: Other
Former Position(s): Governor from 1995 – 2003

Other Positions:  
Chair, Subcommittee on Strategic Forces
Chair, Subcommittee on National Parks

Quotes: 
U.S. water systems are fundamental to everyday American life – but like our pipelines and our food supply, they are vulnerable to dangerous cyberattacks. We must bolster the cybersecurity of all our critical infrastructure.

Featured Video: 
Full Angus King: In Many States, Being An Independent Is ‘Unthinkable’ | MTP Daily | MSNBC

News

Today, U.S Senator Angus King Jr. (I-Maine), a member of the Senate Rules Committee, joined seven of his Senate colleagues to introduce the Freedom to Vote Act, legislation to improve access to the ballot for Americans and advance common-sense election integrity reforms. The legislation – which incorporates many crucial reforms from prior bills – reflects feedback that state and local election officials made in recent months to ensure the local authorities directly responsible for implementing reforms are able to do so effectively. It also elevates the voices of American voters by ending partisan gerrymandering and helping to eliminate the undue influence of secret money in our elections.

“Any threat to the democratic process is a threat to democracy itself,” said Senator King. “In the face of state-level threats that undercut the fundamental right to vote for millions of Americans, we must act now to protect our democracy. Our bill would set commonsense minimum standards to ensure that no state infringes upon its citizens’ right to vote and confront widespread anti-democratic practices such as partisan gerrymandering and dark money spending. Free, fair and open elections are the backbone of our national commitment to government of the people, by the people, and for the people – and through this legislation, we will do our part to pass this experiment in self-government on to the next generation of Americans.”

Twitter

About

Angus King 1

Source: Government page

In January 2013, Angus King was sworn in as Maine’s first Independent United States Senator, filling the same seat once held by storied Maine leaders Edmund Muskie, George Mitchell, and Olympia Snowe.

A strong believer in the need for greater bipartisan dialogue and relationship building, Senator King is proud to join the long line of thoughtful, independent leaders from the State of Maine, and he works hard every day to bring Republicans and Democrats together to find common-sense solutions for Maine and America. He is a proven consensus-builder who “calls ‘em like he sees ‘em”, putting civility and respect ahead of political ideology.

Senator King is a member of the Armed Services Committee, the Select Committee on Intelligence, the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, and the Committee on Rules and Administration. He has made it a priority not to miss Committee hearings, earning him praise from his colleagues and the reputation as a workhorse in the Senate. Armed Services Chairman John McCain (R-Ariz.) once called Senator King “one of the most serious and hard-working members” of the Committee.

In his time in the Senate, Senator King has worked to strengthen America’s national security, conducted critical oversight of the nation’s Intelligence Community, supported common-sense budget priorities that promote prosperity and reduce the national debt, fought the national opioid and heroin epidemic, coordinated efforts to revitalize Maine’s forest economy, advocated for policies that contribute to cleaner, cheaper energy and mitigate climate change, railed against the corrosive effect of unchecked money in politics, fought to improve access to health care, worked to strengthen the government’s support of veterans, and promoted increased access to critical community resources like rural broadband.

Senator King has already achieved significant legislative victories. In 2013, when students across America faced the financial threat of a significant increase in their student loan interest rates, Senator King spearheaded the effort to draft and pass through both the Senate and House the compromise legislation that not only averted rate hikes, but that also put the program on long-term stable financial footing. That hard-fought bipartisan solution, the Student Loan Certainty Act of 2013, has since been projected to save millions of students across the country more than $50 billion in interest payments.

During the government shutdown of 2014, Senator King worked tirelessly with a small group of moderate senators, led by his colleague and friend Senator Susan Collins, to formulate the action plan that eventually led to the reopening of the government.

In fact, it is in small working groups like this that Senator King has focused much of his work. He co-founded the Former Governors Caucus, which brings together the Senate’s former Governors to chart pragmatic approaches to solutions, as well as the Senate Arctic Caucus, which hones in on Maine and America’s growing interest in the Arctic. Senator King also tries to informally bridge the partisan divide in Washington by frequently bringing his colleagues on both sides of the aisle to his home for barbeque dinners, where political talk is banned and the focus is getting to know one another. The bonds that are formed through these relationships often lay the foundation for successful legislation.

Senator King also served as the 72nd Governor of Maine, and during his two terms in the Blaine House, he focused on economic development and job creation.  Then-Governor King also achieved significant reforms in education, mental health services, land conservation, environmental protection, and the delivery of state services. He was re-elected in 1998 by one of the largest margins in Maine’s history.

Senator King is married to Mary Herman and has four sons, Angus III, Duncan, James, and Ben, one daughter, Molly, and six grandchildren. He attended Dartmouth College and the University of Virginia Law School. In his free time, he enjoys exploring the Maine outdoors with his family.

Committees

Caucuses 

  • Afterschool Caucuses

Sponsored Legislation

CONGRESS.GOV 

Offices

 

AUGUSTA

4 Gabriel Drive, Suite 3
Augusta, Maine 04330
Phone: (207) 622-8292

Get Directions

BANGOR

202 Harlow St., Suite 20350
Bangor, ME 04401
Phone: (207) 945-8000

Get Directions

BIDDEFORD

227 Main Street
Biddeford, ME 04005
Phone: (207) 352-5216

Get Directions

PORTLAND

1 Pleasant Street Suite 4W
Portland, ME 04101
P: (207) 245-1565

Get Directions

PRESQUE ISLE

167 Academy St., Suite A
Presque Isle, Maine 04769
Phone: (207) 764-5124

Get Directions

WASHINGTON, D.C.

133 Hart Building
Washington, D.C. 20510
Phone: (202) 224-5344

Get Directions

Experience

Education


  • Dartmouth College
  • Juris Doctor
    University of Virginia

Contact

Email:

Offices

Augusta
4 Gabriel Drive, Suite 3
Augusta, Maine 04330
Phone: Phone: (207) 622-8292

Bangor
202 Harlow St., Suite 20350
Bangor, ME 04401
Phone: Phone: (207) 945-8000

Biddeford
227 Main Street
Biddeford, ME 04005
Phone: Phone: (207) 352-5216

Presque Isle
167 Academy St., Suite A
Presque Isle, Maine 04769
Phone: Phone: (207) 764-5124

Washington, D.C.
133 Hart Building
Washington, D.C. 20510
Phone: Phone: (202) 224-5344

Web

Government Page, Twitter, YouTube, Facebook

Politics

Source: none

Campaign Finance

Open Secrets

Voting Record

Vote Smart

Search

Google

Wikipedia Entry

Angus Stanley King Jr. (born March 31, 1944) is an American politician and lawyer who is the junior United States senator from Maine since 2013.[1] A political independent since 1993, he was the 72nd governor of Maine from 1995 to 2003.

King won Maine’s 2012 Senate election to replace the retiring Republican Olympia Snowe and took office on January 3, 2013. He was reelected to a second term in 2018, following the state’s inaugural instant-runoff voting elections. For committee assignment purposes, he caucuses with the Democratic Party. He is one of two independents currently serving in the Senate, the other being Bernie Sanders of Vermont, who also caucuses with the Democrats.

Early life, education, and early career

King was born in Alexandria, Virginia, the son of Ellen Archer (née Ticer) and Angus Stanley King, a lawyer.[1][2] His father was a U.S. magistrate for the Eastern District of Virginia.[3]

He attended Dartmouth College, earning his B.A. in 1966. While a student at Dartmouth, King joined the Delta Upsilon social fraternity.[4] He then attended the University of Virginia School of Law, graduating in 1969.

Soon after graduating from law school, King entered private law practice in Brunswick, Maine. He was a staff attorney for Pine Tree Legal Assistance in Skowhegan.

In 1972, he served as chief counsel to the U.S. Senate Subcommittee on Alcoholism and Narcotics. King served as a legislative assistant to Democratic U.S. Senator William Hathaway in the 1970s. He was also well-known statewide as a host on public television.[5]

In 1973, when he was 29, King was diagnosed with an aggressive form of malignant melanoma. King has said he believes he survived cancer only because he had health insurance, and has highlighted this experience when explaining his support for the Affordable Care Act.[6][7]

In 1975, King returned to Maine to practice with Smith, Loyd and King in Brunswick. In 1983 he was appointed vice president of Swift River/Hafslund Company, which developed alternative energy (hydroelectric and biomass) projects in New England.

In 1989, King founded Northeast Energy Management, Inc., a company that developed and operated electrical energy conservation projects. In 1994 he sold the company. As of 2012 King’s investments were valued at between $4.8 million and $22.5 million.[8]

Governor of Maine

1994 election

In May 1993, King announced he would run for governor of Maine as an independent. Incumbent Governor John McKernan, a Republican, was term-limited and could not seek another term.[9] King abandoned his lifelong affiliation with the Maine Democratic Party. “The Democratic Party as an institution has become too much the party that is looking for something from government,” King explained to the Bangor Daily News a few weeks after he announced his candidacy.[10]

The Republican nominee was Susan Collins, Commissioner of Professional and Financial Regulation under Governor John McKernan and a protégée of U.S. Senator William Cohen, and at the time relatively unknown to the electorate. The Democratic nominee was former Governor and U.S. Representative Joseph E. Brennan. It was Brennan’s fifth campaign for governor.

The general election was a highly competitive four-way race between King, Collins, Brennan, and Green Party nominee Jonathan Carter. King invested early in television advertising during Maine’s unusually early June primary, allowing him to emerge from the primary season on an equal footing with his rivals. He positioned himself as a businessman and a pragmatic environmentalist focused on job creation and education.[11] The Washington Times described King as an idealist who “wants to slash regulations but preserve the environment; hold the line on taxes; impose work and education requirements on welfare recipients; experiment with public school choice and cut at least $60 million from the state budget.”[12] His opponents criticized him for flip-flopping. Collins argued King “presents different images, depending on who he is talking to. Angus has been a Democrat his whole life. In my opinion, he became an independent because he didn’t think he could beat Joe Brennan in a primary. He’s extremely smooth, articulate and bright, but he says different things to different groups.”[13]

King narrowly won the November 8 election with 35% of the vote to Brennan’s 34%, a margin of just 7,878 votes. Collins received 23% of the vote and Carter 6%. King won eight counties, Collins five and Brennan three.[14] King’s election as an independent was not unprecedented in Maine politics, as independent James B. Longley had been elected 20 years earlier.

1998 election

King won reelection to a second term in 1998 with 59% of the vote, defeating Republican Jim Longley Jr. (the son of the former governor) (19%) and Democrat Thomas Connolly (12%). King’s 59% was the highest share of the vote a gubernatorial candidate had received since Brennan’s 1982 reelection with 62%. Brennan’s 1982 victory was also the last time until 1998 that a gubernatorial candidate had won a majority of the vote, and King’s 1998 reelection was the last time a Maine gubernatorial candidate received the majority of the votes cast until 2018.

Tenure

King meets with a Russian delegation as Maine governor in October 2002.

During his tenure, King was the only governor in the United States unaffiliated with any political party. He was also one of only two governors nationwide not affiliated with either of the two major parties, the other being Jesse Ventura of Minnesota, who was elected in 1998 as a member of the Reform Party. The term of Connecticut’s independent governor Lowell Weicker ended when King’s began. In his book Independent Nation (2004), political analyst John Avlon describes all three governors as radical centrist thinkers.[15]

In 2002 King launched the Maine Learning Technology Initiative (MLTI) to provide laptops for every public middle-school student in the state, the first initiative of its kind in the nation.[16] It met with considerable resistance due to its cost but was enacted by the Maine Legislature. On September 5, 2002, the state began the program with a four-year $37.2-million contract with Apple Inc. to equip all 7th- and 8th-grade students and teachers in the state with laptops.[17][18]

As governor, King signed legislation requiring that all school employees be fingerprinted and undergo background checks.[19]

Post-gubernatorial career (2003–2013)

The day after he left office in 2003, King, his wife, Mary Herman, and their two children, who were 12 and 9 at the time, embarked on a road trip in a 40-foot motor home to see America. Over the next six months, the family traveled 15,000 miles and visited 33 states before returning home in June 2003.[20]

During his post-gubernatorial residency in Maine, he lectured at Bowdoin College in Brunswick and Bates College in Lewiston. He was appointed a visiting lecturer at Bowdoin in 2004 and an endowed lecturer at Bates in 2009, teaching courses in American politics and political leadership at both institutions.[21][22]

In 2007 King and Rob Gardiner, formerly of the Maine Public Broadcasting Network, formed Independence Wind, a wind energy company.[23] In August 2009 Independence Wind along with joint venture partner Wagner Forest Management won Maine DEP approval for construction of a proposed $120-million, 22-turbine, utility-scale wind power project along a prominent mountain ridge in Roxbury, Maine.[24] To avoid the appearance of a conflict of interest, King sold his share of the company after entering the 2012 U.S. Senate election.[25] Of the project, King has said, “People who say wind is only an intermittent resource are looking for a one-shot solution. And my experience is that there are rarely silver bullets, but there is often silver buckshot. Wind is an adjunct source of energy. Ten percent, 20% can be very significant”.[26]

United States Senate

Elections

On March 5, 2012, King announced that he was running for the U.S. Senate seat being vacated by Olympia Snowe.[27][28] King said “hogwash” to allegations by some Republicans that he had cut a deal with Democrats to keep U.S. Rep. Chellie Pingree out of the race.[29]

King’s Senate campaign came under scrutiny for posting a heavily edited newspaper profile of him on its website.[30]

On November 6, 2012, King won the Senate race with 53%[31] of the vote, beating Democrat Cynthia Dill and Republican Charlie Summers.[32][33] The following week, King announced that he would caucus with Senate Democrats, explaining not only that it made more sense to affiliate with the party that had a clear majority, but that he would have been largely excluded from the committee process had he not caucused with a party.[34][35] King said he had not ruled out caucusing with the Republicans if they took control of the Senate in 2014 United States Senate elections,[36] but when Republicans did win the majority that year, he remained in the Democratic caucus.[37] King remained in the Democratic caucus after the 2016, 2018, and the 2020 elections, the first two of which also resulted in Republican Senate majorities and the last of which produced a 50-50 tie.

On November 6, 2018, King was reelected, defeating Republican Eric Brakey and Democrat Zak Ringelstein.[38]

Tenure

113th Congress (2013–2015)

King with Coast Guard officials in Washington, 2013.

King supported reform of the Senate filibuster, noting that senators are no longer required to stand on the floor and speak during a filibuster. He also pointed out that the Constitution contains no 60-vote requirement to conduct business in the Senate.[39][non-primary source needed] Accordingly, in 2013 King voted in favor of the so-called nuclear option to eliminate the filibuster for most presidential nominees.[40][non-primary source needed]

King opposed attempts by the U.S. House to cut $40 billion from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program over ten years, fearing that it “would affect people in a serious way” and drive more people to soup kitchens and food banks. He supported the more modest Senate efforts to save $4 billion over the same period by closing loopholes.[41]

In 2014 King was chosen for the annual tradition of reading George Washington’s Farewell Address to the Senate.[42]

Martin Dempsey (right), speaks with King (left) at Senate Armed Services Committee meeting in 2014.

King endorsed his colleague Susan Collins for reelection in the 2014 U.S. Senate election,[43] calling her a “model Senator”. At the same time, he endorsed Democratic Senator Jeanne Shaheen of New Hampshire for reelection.[44] King also endorsed Eliot Cutler for governor in the 2014 election, as he had in 2010, but on October 29, 2014, he switched his endorsement to Democratic nominee Mike Michaud.[45][46] He also endorsed Democrat Emily Cain for the Maine’s second congressional district election[47] and Republican Senator Lamar Alexander of Tennessee in his reelection campaign.[48]

After Republicans gained the Senate majority in the 2014 election, King announced that he would continue to caucus with the Democrats. He cited his belief that it is good for a state to have a senator from each party, and that it is important to have a senator who caucuses with the same party as the President, saying, “In the end, who I caucus with is less important than who I work with.” He added, “It does not mean I have become a Democrat. It does not mean I have made a promise to anybody.”[37]

116th Congress (2019–2021)

In 2020, President Donald Trump said King was “worse than any Democrat” after King had a “testy” exchange with Vice President Mike Pence in a phone call in which King had criticized the executive branch’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States. King stated he had “never been so mad about a phone call in my entire life,” after the phone call with Pence. He also called the President and Vice President’s response to the pandemic “a dereliction of duty.”[49]

117th Congress (2021–present)

King was participating in the certification of the 2021 United States Electoral College vote count when Trump supporters stormed the United States Capitol. When they breached the Capitol, King and other senators were moved to a safe location.[50] He called the event a “violent insurrection” and “unspeakably sad”, and blamed Trump.[51] In the wake of the attack, King announced that he supports invoking the Twenty-fifth Amendment to the United States Constitution to remove Trump from office.[52]

Committee assignments

Current

Previous

Caucus memberships

Legislation sponsored

The following is an incomplete list of legislation that King has sponsored:

Political positions

King has been described as a moderate Independent.[54] He has called himself “neither a Democrat nor a Republican, but an American“.[55] The nonpartisan National Journal gave him a 2013 composite ideology score of 59% liberal and 41% conservative.[56] His Crowdpac score is −4.3 (10 is the most conservative, −10 the most liberal), based on a data aggregation of his campaign contributions, votes, and speeches.[57] In a study published by The Washington Post called “Party Unity scores,” King voted with the Democratic Party 43% of the time.[58] He has also received higher approval ratings from liberal interest groups than conservative ones. King has been rated 89% by the average liberal interest group; the American Conservative Union gave him a 7% lifetime conservative rating in 2020.[59][60] GovTrack ranks King among the more moderate members of the Senate, near the Senate’s ideological center.[61] In 2014, King endorsed his Republican colleague from Maine, Susan Collins.[62] According to FiveThirtyEight, which tracks Congressional votes, King had voted in line with President Trump’s position on legislation about 38% of the time as of January 2021.[63]

Agriculture

In August 2018, King was one of 31 senators to vote against the Protect Interstate Commerce Act of 2018, a proposed amendment to the 2018 United States farm bill that would mandate states to authorize agricultural product sales not prohibited under federal law. After the farm bill passed in December, King and Susan Collins released a statement expressing their delight at the amendment not being included as there were a “number of state laws in Maine that would have been undermined if this amendment was adopted, including those on crate bans for livestock, consumer protections for blueberry inspections, and environmental safeguards for cranberry cultivation”.[64]

Economy

King has called for the continuation of a tariff on imported athletic footwear, citing the potential loss of jobs at New Balance‘s Skowhegan and Madison factories in Maine.[65] Also while governor, King vetoed a bill that would have raised Maine’s minimum wage by 25 cents per hour.[66]

In 2017, King opposed the Republican tax bill, criticizing its passage on a party-line vote without hearings,[67][68] saying: “The Bangor City Council would not amend the leash law using this process.”[68] King criticized the legislation for adding $1 trillion to the U.S. budget deficit over ten years and sought to return the bill to committee, but his proposal failed on a party-line vote.[68]

In March 2018, King and fellow Maine senator Susan Collins introduced the Northern Border Regional Commission Reauthorization Act, a bill that would bolster the Northern Border Regional Commission (NBRC) and was included in the 2018 United States farm bill. In June 2019, when King and Collins announced the NBRC would award grant funding to the University of Maine, the senators called the funding an investment in Maine’s forest economy that would “help those who have relied on this crucial sector for generations” and “bolster efforts by UMaine to open more opportunities in rural communities.”[69]

On April 15, 2020, the Trump administration invited King to join a bipartisan task force on the reopening of the economy amid the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.[70]

Foreign relations and national security

King has voted to arm Syrian rebels who are fighting Syrian President Bashar al-Assad and ISIL militants.[71]

King favors the normalization of U.S.–Cuba relations. He opposes the U.S. embargo against Cuba, calling it an “antiquated” relic of the Cold War; in 2015 King introduced legislation to lift the embargo.[72][73]

As a member of the Senate Intelligence Committee, King participated in its probe of Russia’s interference in the 2016 U.S. elections.[74] King said that the entire committee had “no doubt whatsoever” about the Kremlin’s culpability in the meddling and described the cyberattacks as “a frontal assault on our democracy” that could present a long-term threat.[75]

In May 2018 King and fellow Maine senator Susan Collins introduced the PRINT Act, a bill that would halt collections of countervailing duties and anti-dumping duties on Canadian newsprint and require the U.S. Department of Commerce to conduct a study of economic health of printing and publishing industries. Proponents of the bill argued it would offer a lifeline to the publishing industry amid newsprint price increases. Critics accused it of setting “a dangerous precedent for future investigations into allegations of unfair trade practices.”[76]

In August 2018 King and 16 other lawmakers urged the Trump administration to impose sanctions under the Global Magnitsky Act against Chinese officials responsible for human rights abuses against the Uyghur Muslim minority in western China’s Xinjiang region.[77] They wrote: “The detention of as many as a million or more Uyghurs and other predominantly Muslim ethnic minorities in “political reeducation” centers or camps requires a tough, targeted, and global response.”[78]

In November 2018 King joined Senators Chris Coons, Marco Rubio and a bipartisan group of lawmakers in sending the Trump administration a letter raising concerns about the People’s Republic of China’s undue influence on media outlets and academic institutions in the United States. They wrote: “In American news outlets, Beijing has used financial ties to suppress negative information about the CCP. … Beijing has also sought to use relationships with American academic institutions and student groups to shape public discourse.”[79]

In late 2018 King voted to withdraw U.S. military aid for Saudi Arabia’s war in Yemen.[80]

In December 2018, after President Trump announced the withdrawal of American troops from Syria, King was one of six senators to sign a letter expressing concern about the move and their belief “that such action at this time is a premature and costly mistake that not only threatens the safety and security of the United States, but also emboldens ISIS, Bashar al Assad, Iran, and Russia.”[81]

In October 2019, King was one of six senators to sign a bipartisan letter to Trump calling on him to “urge Turkey to end their offensive and find a way to a peaceful resolution while supporting our Kurdish partners to ensure regional stability” and arguing that to leave Syria without installing protections for American allies would endanger both them and the U.S.[82]

Iran

In 2015 King supported the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, an international agreement with Iran. In voting against a “resolution of disapproval” in opposition to the agreement, King stated, “The current alternatives, if this agreement is rejected, are either unrealistic or downright dangerous.”[83]

In May 2019 King said he believed U.S. intel on Iran was accurate but that he wanted to know which country was reacting to the actions of the other, adding that he was “gravely concerned because of the possibility of miscalculation, misunderstanding, misreading of some event and all of the sudden you’re on the ladder of escalation that could be dangerous for this country and for the Middle East.”[84]

After President Trump halted retaliatory air strikes against Iran after Iran downed an American surveillance drone in June 2019, King said he agreed with the decision not to carry out the strikes but expressed concern about Trump’s potentially limited options after steps taken by National Security Advisor John Bolton and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo. King also questioned the difference in U.S. relations with Iran that year as opposed to any other in the country’s history and asserted that it was “a high-stakes gamble” if the U.S.’s pressure on Iran was unsuccessful.[85]

Environment and energy

King supports action to combat climate change and carries a laminated graph of increases in carbon dioxide in Earth’s atmosphere to respond to climate change denialists.[86] He was the only member of Congress to join a three-day U.S. Coast Guard fact-finding mission to Greenland in 2016, where he witnessed melting ice sheets firsthand and said that the impacts of climate change were “amazing and scary.”[87] In March 2019 King joined Senate Republicans and voted in opposition to the Green New Deal.[88]

King opposes oil drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, believing the amount of oil is not worth the environmental risk of extracting it. He also believes that new developments in the energy field, such as fracking, should be subject to “all appropriate environmental safeguards to protect the American people and the American land.”[39][non-primary source needed] King is opposed to the Keystone XL pipeline, stating that the “project will facilitate the transport of some of the world’s dirtiest and most climate-harming oil through our country”[89][non-primary source needed] and has cast several votes against legislation authorizing its construction.[90][91][92] He said he was “frustrated” with President Obama’s delay in deciding whether to authorize construction, but that he opposed Congress legislating the approval or disapproval of a construction project.[93]

King has expressed opposition to the creation of a Maine Woods National Park, stating on his 2012 campaign website that local control is the best way to conserve land,[39] but in 2014 stating that he was keeping an open mind about the idea.[94]

King initially expressed “serious reservations” about proposals to establish the Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument,[95] but expressed support for President Obama’s creation of the monument in 2016, saying that the administration had made commitments that convinced him that “the benefits of the designation will far outweigh any detriment”; that the monument would not hurt Maine’s pulp and paper industry, and that the monument would help diversify the local economy.[96]

King opposes efforts in Maine to ban the baiting and trapping of bears, including an effort to put the question to voters in 2014, calling such practices necessary to prevent interaction between bears and people, and stating the practices are based on science and the views of experts.[97]

In 2017 King and Idaho Senator Jim Risch introduced the Securing Energy Infrastructure Act. The Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee approved the bill in 2018. The bill creates a pilot program for the federal government to study analog, nondigital and physical systems that can be incorporated into the power grid to mitigate the potential effects of a cyberattack. The idea for the bill came after a 2015 cyberattack in Ukraine took down a large portion of the country’s energy grid.[98] In April 2019 King was one of four senators caucusing with the Democrats who voted with Republicans to confirm David Bernhardt, an oil executive, as Secretary of the Interior Department.[99]

In April 2019 King was one of 12 senators to sign a bipartisan letter to top senators on the Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development advocating that the Energy Department be granted maximum funding for carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS), arguing that American job growth could be stimulated by investment in capturing carbon emissions and expressing disagreement with President Trump’s 2020 budget request to combine the two federal programs that do carbon capture research.[100]

In July 2019 King called climate change “one of the most serious threats to” the United States, saying that two thirds of Arctic ice has disappeared over the past 30 years. A release from King’s office stated that he had asserted the vital need for the U.S. to return to the aspirations of the Paris Climate Accord.[101]

Immigration

King strongly criticized President Donald Trump‘s Executive Order 13769, which barred the admission of refugees to the U.S. and barred travel by nationals of several Muslim-majority countries to the country. King stated: “This is probably the worst foreign policy decision since the invasion of Iraq. What it’s done is played right into ISIS’s hands. They want us to turn this into a war of the west against Islam. They have explicitly said they want to drive a wedge … There are 1.6 billion Muslims in the world and we don’t want a war with all of them. We don’t need a war with all of them. We’re not opposed to all of them.”[102] King noted that U.S. forces fought alongside Muslim Iraqi troops, and that much valuable counterterrorism intelligence was shared with the U.S. by Muslim nations.[102]

In 2018 King introduced legislation to halt separations of immigrant families at the border.[103]

In June 2019, King and fellow Maine senator Susan Collins released a joint statement confirming that they had questioned U.S. Customs and Border Protection “on the process being used to clear” asylum seekers for transportation to Portland, Maine, and opined that it was “clearly not a sustainable approach to handling the asylum situation.” Collins and King were said to both be “interested in providing additional resources to the federal agencies that process asylum claims, so we can reduce the existing backlog and adjudicate new claims in a more timely fashion.”[104]

Gun laws

King supports expanding background checks to most firearms transactions, with exceptions for transfers between family members, calling such a position “the single most effective step” that can be taken to keep guns out of the wrong hands. He supports limiting the size of magazines to 10 rounds, and to make purchasing a gun for someone not legally allowed to have one a federal crime. He does not support a ban on assault weapons, believing it will not work and that such a ban is not based on the functionality of the weapons, which are not relevantly different from the many hunting rifles owned by Maine residents. He noted that the vast majority of gun crimes are committed with handguns, not rifles.[105]

King voted for the Manchin–Toomey amendment to expand background checks for gun purchases.[106]

In 2018 King was a cosponsor of the NICS Denial Notification Act,[107] legislation developed in the aftermath of the Stoneman Douglas High School shooting that would require federal authorities to inform states within a day after a person failing the National Instant Criminal Background Check System attempted to buy a firearm.[108]

In August 2019, following two mass shootings in El Paso and Dayton, King cosponsored the Extreme Risk Protection Order Act, a bill authorizing states to use grants to develop red flag laws which would allow family members to petition courts for an order that would temporarily prevent someone from purchasing a gun and an order for law enforcement to take a firearm away.[109]

Health issues

King supports the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA or Obamacare), but has expressed support for modest adjustments to the legislation if they can be done on a bipartisan basis.[110][111] In 2013 he voted to restore funding for the ACA as part of an amendment to legislation that funded government operations for 45 days.[112] He has said that those opposed to the ACA who are attempting to discourage people from purchasing health insurance are “guilty of murder” and that doing so was “one of the grossest violations of our humanity that I could think of.”[113] In making this comment, King noted a time in his life when he believed he would have died had he not just acquired health insurance.[113]

In 2015, as part of the Obama administration’s fiscal year 2016 budget, the United States Department of Veteran Affairs proposed congressional authorization for $6.8 million toward leasing 56,600 square feet at an unspecified location in Portland, Maine, to expand a clinic that would authorize southern Maine veterans to receive basic medical and mental health care locally. King supported the proposal. He and Susan Collins released a statement that ensuring Maine veterans had access to high quality care “is one of our top priorities, and we’re pursuing the input of local veterans and interested stakeholders to understand their perspective about the proposal.”[114]

In January 2017 King voted against the Republican Senate budget plan to accelerate repeal of the ACA and block repeal legislation from being filibustered; the measure passed on a largely party line 51–48 vote.[110] He spoke out against the House Republican repeal legislation, noting that the Congressional Budget Office estimated that 14 million Americans would lose health insurance if the legislation were enacted.[115] Of the House Republican bill, King said, “If you were designing a bill to hammer my state, it would be this bill,” adding that it would most adversely affect Maine residents between the ages of 50 and 65.[116]

King is a supporter of the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) program.[117]

King favors abortion rights.[118]

In February 2017 King and 30 other senators signed a letter to Kaléo Pharmaceuticals in response to an increase of the opioid-overdose-reversing device Evzio’s price from $690 in 2014 to $4,500. They requested the detailed price structure for Evzio, the number of devices Kaléo Pharmaceuticals set aside for donation, and the totality of federal reimbursements Evzio received in the previous year.[119]

King criticized Trump’s 2017 budget proposal for its cuts to medical research.[120] In 2018 he voted with all Republicans except Rand Paul and six Democrats to confirm Alex Azar, Trump’s nominee for Health Secretary.[121][122]

In June 2018 King and fellow Maine Senator Susan Collins released a statement endorsing a proposal by FCC Chairman Ajit Pai intended to boost funding for the Rural Health Care Program of the Universal Service Fund, writing that “with demand for RHC funding continuing to rise, any further inaction would risk leaving rural healthcare practitioners without lifesaving telemedicine services. This long-overdue funding increase would be a boon to both healthcare providers and patients in rural communities across our country.”[123]

In July 2019 King was one of eight senators to cosponsor the Palliative Care and Hospice Education and Training Act (PCHETA), a bill intended to strengthen training for new and existing physicians, people who teach palliative care, and other providers who are on palliative care teams that grant patients and their families a voice in their care and treatment goals.[124]

In October 2019 King was one of 27 senators to sign a letter to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer advocating the passage of the Community Health Investment, Modernization, and Excellence (CHIME) Act, which was set to expire the following month. The senators warned that if the funding for the Community Health Center Fund (CHCF) was allowed to expire, it “would cause an estimated 2,400 site closures, 47,000 lost jobs, and threaten the health care of approximately 9 million Americans.”[125]

King has voted against Republican attempts to completely defund Planned Parenthood, calling the proposals an “unfounded yet relentless assault” and “another example of misguided outrage that would only hurt those who need help the most.”[126] No federal funds go to Planned Parenthood for abortions (federal dollars pay for other health care services provided by the group, such as contraception and screenings for cancer and sexually transmitted diseases), but Republicans have sought to completely defund the organization because it provides abortions with other funds.[127] King stated that supporters of the bill were in effect voting to deprive low-income Americans of healthcare over an issue “that has nothing to do with the 97 percent of the services that Planned Parenthood provides,” saying: “To me, this bill is like attacking Brazil after Pearl Harbor.”[127]

Minimum wage

On March 5, 2021, King voted against Bernie Sanders‘s amendment to include a $15/hour minimum wage in the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021.[128]

Railroad safety

In June 2019 King was one of ten senators to cosponsor the Safe Freight Act, a bill that would require freight trains have one or more certified conductors and a certified engineer aboard who can collaborate on how to protect both the train and people living near the tracks. The legislation was meant to correct a Federal Railroad Administration rollback of a proposed rule intended to establish safety standards.[129]

Same-sex marriage

King supports same-sex marriage.[130] He signed an amicus brief to the U.S. Supreme Court in United States v. Windsor encouraging it to strike down the Defense of Marriage Act.[131]

United States Postal Service

In March 2019 King was a cosponsor of a bipartisan resolution led by Gary Peters and Jerry Moran that opposed privatization of the United States Postal Service (USPS), citing the USPS as a self-sustained establishment and noting concerns that privatization could cause higher prices and reduced services for its customers, especially in rural communities.[132]

Telecommunications

In April 2019 King was one of seven senators to sponsor the Digital Equity Act of 2019, legislation establishing a $120 million grant program that would fund both the creation and implementation of “comprehensive digital equity plans” in each U.S. state to support projects developed by individuals and groups. The bill also gave the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) the role of evaluating and providing guidance for digital equity projects.[133]

Trade

In February 2019, during ongoing trade disputes between the United States and China, King was one of ten senators to sign a bipartisan letter to Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen and Energy Secretary Rick Perry asserting that the American government “should consider a ban on the use of Huawei inverters in the United States and work with state and local regulators to raise awareness and mitigate potential threats” and urging them “to work with all federal, state and local regulators, as well as the hundreds of independent power producers and electricity distributors nationwide to ensure our systems are protected.”[134]

Electoral history

1994 Maine gubernatorial election
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
IndependentAngus King 180,829 35.37% N/A
DemocraticJoseph Brennan172,95133.83%-12.87%
RepublicanSusan Collins117,99023.08%-23.62%
GreenJonathan Carter32,6956.39%N/A
Write-In6,5761.29%N/A
Write-ins2670.05%N/A
Turnout511,308~55%
Independent gain from RepublicanSwing
1998 Maine gubernatorial election[135]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
IndependentAngus King (Incumbent) 246,772 58.61% +23.25%
RepublicanJames B. Longley, Jr.79,71618.93%−4.14%
DemocraticThomas J. Connolly50,50612.00%−21.83%
GreenPat LaMarche28,7226.82%+0.43%
ConstitutionWilliam P. Clarke, Jr.15,2933.63%N/A
Turnout421,009
Independent holdSwing
2012 United States Senate election in Maine[136]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
IndependentAngus King 370,580 52.89% N/A
RepublicanCharlie Summers215,39930.75%−43.26%
DemocraticCynthia Dill92,90013.26%−7.33%
IndependentSteve Woods10,2891.47%N/A
IndependentDanny Dalton5,8070.83%N/A
LibertarianAndrew Ian Dodge5,6240.80%N/A
Turnout700,599
Independent gain from Republican
2018 United States Senate election in Maine[137]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
IndependentAngus King (incumbent) 344,575 54.31% +1.42%
RepublicanEric Brakey223,50235.23%+4.48%
DemocraticZak Ringelstein66,26810.45%−2.81%
Turnout634,345
Independent hold

Personal life

King’s first wife was Edie Birney.[138] She is the mother of King’s three older sons. King and Birney divorced in 1982.[138]

In 1984, King married Mary Herman, his current wife.[138] King has five children and six grandchildren.[139]

King is an Episcopalian.[138][140] He rides a Harley-Davidson motorcycle.[141]

In June 2015, King underwent a successful surgery that removed a cancerous prostate that had been detected in a screening and biopsy. The surgery did not change King’s plans to run for reelection in 2018.[142]

As of 2018 King’s net worth, according to OpenSecrets.org, was more than $9.4 million.[143]

On August 19, 2021, King and fellow senators Roger Wicker and John Hickenlooper tested positive for COVID-19.[144] He fully recovered from the disease, saying, “I didn’t feel great during the worst of my illness, but I’m confident that I would have felt a whole lot worse if I hadn’t received the vaccine”.[145]

Honors and awards

Scholastic

University degrees
LocationDateSchoolDegree
 New Hampshire1966Dartmouth CollegeBachelor of Arts (BA)
 Virginia1969University of Virginia School of LawJuris Doctor (JD)
Chancellor, visitor, governor, rector and fellowships
LocationDateSchoolPosition
 Maine2004–presentBowdoin CollegeDistinguished Lecturer[22]
 MassachusettsFall 2004 – presentInstitute of Politics at Harvard UniversityFellow[22][146]

Honorary degrees

Honorary degrees
LocationDateSchoolDegreeGave Commencement Address
 Maine2007Bowdoin CollegeDoctor of Laws (LL.D)[22]
 Maine8 May 2016Husson UniversityDoctor of Science (D.Sc)[147]Yes
 Maine12 May 2018University of Maine at Presque IsleDoctor of Humane Letters (DHL)[148]Yes

Memberships and fellowships

LocationDateOrganisationPosition
 Maine1969–presentMaine State Bar AssociationMember

References

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  3. ^ “Retired Virginia U.S. Magistrate Angus King Dies”.
  4. ^ “Greeks in the 113th Congress”. North American Interfraternity Conference. Archived from the original on March 27, 2014. Retrieved September 2, 2013.
  5. ^ Nemitz, Bill (April 14, 2013). “King’s first 100 days: ‘The hardest I’ve ever worked in my life. Portland Press Herald. Retrieved April 30, 2013.
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  10. ^ Ripley, John (May 18, 1993). “Candidate King maps course to Augusta”. Bangor Daily News.
  11. ^ “AD DEPICTS KING AS USING NEW IDEAS TO ENCOURAGE JOBS”. Portland Press Herald. October 1, 1994.
  12. ^ Snow, Tony (July 9, 1994). “Maine bellwether for voter discontent?”. The Washington Times.
  13. ^ Hale, John (October 4, 1994). “A King pursues top spot: Former liberal now sees himself as ‘pragmatic“. Bangor Daily News.
  14. ^ “Our Campaigns – ME Governor Race – Nov 08, 1994”. Ourcampaigns.com. Retrieved October 11, 2014.
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  16. ^ Waters, John (2009). “Maine Ingredients”. T.H.E. Journal. 36 (8): 35.
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  86. ^ Koss, Geof (April 22, 2016). “Senator has handy response for science skeptics”. E&E News.
  87. ^ Overton, Penelope (August 25, 2016). “On trip to Greenland, Sen. King finds effect of climate change ‘amazing and scary. Portland Press Herald. Retrieved September 21, 2020.
  88. ^ Rosane, Olivia (March 27, 2019). “Senate Dems Vote ‘Present’ on Green New Deal to Foil McConnell’s Ploy”. EcoWatch. Retrieved March 27, 2019.
  89. ^ “King Opposes Keystone Pipeline; Will Vote to Move to Full Debate”. king.senate.gov. January 12, 2015. Retrieved September 21, 2020.
  90. ^ “U.S. Senate: Roll Call Vote”. senate.gov. Retrieved January 27, 2015.
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  93. ^ “Angus King casts deciding vote as Keystone XL pipeline bill dies in Senate”. Bangor Daily News. November 18, 2014. Retrieved September 21, 2020.
  94. ^ Sambides, Jr., Nick (June 10, 2014). “National park debate to reopen in northern Penobscot County; Lincoln chamber to hold informational meetings”. Bangor Daily News. Retrieved June 10, 2014.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  95. ^ Sambides, Jr., Nick (November 23, 2015). “Collins, King, Poliquin express ‘serious reservations’ about national monument”. Bangor Daily News. Retrieved November 23, 2015.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  96. ^ Pérez-Peña, Richard (August 24, 2016). “Obama Designates National Monument in Maine, to Dismay of Some”. The New York Times. Retrieved September 21, 2020.
  97. ^ Smith, George (April 6, 2014). “Senator Angus King defends Maine’s bear management”. Bangor Daily News. Retrieved April 6, 2014.
  98. ^ Boyd, Aaron (December 20, 2018). “Plan to Dumb-Down the Power Grid In Name of Cybersecurity Passes Senate”. Nextgov.com. Retrieved December 28, 2018.
  99. ^ D’Angelo, Chris (April 11, 2019). “David Bernhardt Confirmed As Interior Department Chief”. The Huffington Post. Retrieved April 11, 2019.
  100. ^ Green, Miranda (April 5, 2019). “Bipartisan senators want ‘highest possible’ funding for carbon capture technology”. The Hill.
  101. ^ “Sen. King urges action against climate change”. newscentermaine.com. July 21, 2019.
  102. ^ a b Savransky, Rebecca (January 31, 2017). “Angus King: Trump travel ban ‘worst foreign policy decision’ since Iraq war”. The Hill. Retrieved September 21, 2020.
  103. ^ “King, Colleagues Introduce Legislation to Halt Separation of Immigrant Families”. King.senate.gov. Retrieved March 21, 2019.
  104. ^ “Sens. Collins, King question why surge of asylum-seekers going to Portland”. wmtw.com. June 14, 2019.
  105. ^ King, Angus (April 11, 2013). “Angus King presents his position on gun control”. Bangor Daily News. Retrieved April 18, 2013.
  106. ^ Miller, Kevin (April 14, 2013). “Collins, King support gun law”. Kennebec Journal. Retrieved October 28, 2013.
  107. ^ Gaudiano, Nicole (March 5, 2018). “School safety bill introduced by bipartisan senators in response to Florida shooting”. wfmynews2.com.
  108. ^ “Collins-backed push to keep criminals from guns progresses”. seacoastonline.com. March 10, 2018. Retrieved September 21, 2020.
  109. ^ Carney, Jordain (August 5, 2019). “Senators ask for committee vote on ‘red flag’ bills after shootings”. The Hill. Retrieved September 21, 2020.
  110. ^ a b Collins, Steve (January 12, 2017). “Angus King, Susan Collins split on repeal of Obamacare”. Sun Journal. Retrieved September 21, 2020.
  111. ^ Everett, Burgess; Haberkorn, Jennifer (December 15, 2016). “Democrats open to replacing Obamacare”. Politico. Retrieved September 20, 2020.
  112. ^ “U.S. Senate: Legislation & Records Home > Votes > S.Amdt.1974”. Senate.gov. Retrieved September 27, 2013.
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  114. ^ Miller, Kevin (October 1, 2015). “VA pursues expansion of its outpatient care clinic in Portland”. Portland Press Herald. Retrieved September 21, 2020.
  115. ^ “Budget office says GOP health care plan would leave millions uninsured”. Bangor Daily News. March 13, 2017. Retrieved September 21, 2020.
  116. ^ Bolton, Alexander (March 9, 2017). “Maine senator: House GOP healthcare plan hammers my state”. The Hill. Retrieved September 21, 2020.
  117. ^ Pear, Robert (December 19, 2017). “With Children’s Health Program Running Dry, Parents Beg Congress: ‘Do the Right Thing. The New York Times. Retrieved September 21, 2020.
  118. ^ Shepherd, Michael (August 22, 2012). “Maine candidates stand firm on abortion beliefs”. Portland Press Herald. Retrieved September 21, 2020.
  119. ^ Mole, Beth (February 9, 2017). “Kaléo’s opioid overdose drug went from $690 to $4,500—and senators want answers”. Ars Technica. Retrieved September 21, 2020.
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  122. ^ Pear, Robert (January 24, 2018). “Senate Confirms Trump Nominee Alex Azar as Health Secretary”. The New York Times. Retrieved October 30, 2018.
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  124. ^ Holdren, Wendy (July 11, 2019). “Senators reintroduce Palliative Care and Hospice Education and Training Act”. register-herald.com.
  125. ^ “U.S. Senator Tammy Baldwin Working to Extend Long Term Funding for Community Health Centers”. Urban Milwaukee. October 23, 2019. Retrieved September 21, 2020.
  126. ^ Sherperd, Michael (December 4, 2015). “Collins, King vote against Senate bid to defund Planned Parenthood”. Bangor Daily News.
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  128. ^ Johnson, Jake (March 5, 2021). “Here Are the 8 Democrats Who Just Joined GOP to Vote Down Sanders’ $15 Minimum Wage Amendment”. Common Dreams. Retrieved March 5, 2021.
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  130. ^ Dolan, Scott (June 26, 2015). “Maine reacts to Supreme Court ruling affirming same-sex marriage in all states”. Portland Press Herald. Retrieved March 14, 2018.
  131. ^ Long, Robert (March 1, 2013). “King, Pingree and Michaud want courts to strike federal ban on same-sex marriage”. Bangor Daily News. Retrieved April 7, 2013.
  132. ^ “Peters, Moran reintroduce bipartisan resolution opposing privatization of USPS”. uppermichiganssource.com. March 7, 2019. Retrieved September 21, 2020.
  133. ^ Birnbaum, Emily (April 17, 2019). “Dems introduce bill to tackle ‘digital divide. The Hill.
  134. ^ Perticone, Joe (February 25, 2019). “A bipartisan group of senators want the Trump administration to deal another blow to Chinese tech giant Huawei”. Business Insider. Retrieved September 21, 2020.
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  141. ^ Bayly, Julia (July 23, 2012). “Senate candidate Angus King looking for adventure on his Harley”. Bangor Daily News. Retrieved March 14, 2018.
  142. ^ Anderson, J. Craig (June 26, 2017). “Sen. Angus King’s prostate surgery is a success, his wife says”. Portland Press Herald.
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  144. ^ Sheehey, Maeve. “Sens. Wicker, King, Hickenlooper test positive for Covid-19 after vaccination”. POLITICO. Retrieved August 19, 2021.
  145. ^ “Mississippi Sen. Wicker says he has recovered from COVID-19”. ABC News. Retrieved September 24, 2021.
  146. ^ “Angus King, Jr”. iop.harvard.edu. Retrieved September 21, 2020.
  147. ^ “Husson University to Confer Three Honorary Degrees at Commencement”. Newswire. May 5, 2016. Retrieved September 21, 2020.
  148. ^ “U.S. Senator Angus King to speak during UMPI’s 109th Commencement Exercises”. umpi.edu. May 2, 2018. Retrieved September 21, 2020.

External links

Political offices
Preceded by

Governor of Maine
1995–2003
Succeeded by

U.S. Senate
Preceded by

U.S. Senator (Class 1) from Maine
2013–present
Served alongside: Susan Collins
Incumbent
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by

United States senators by seniority
57th
Succeeded by


Recent Elections

2018 US Senator

Angus King ()344,57554.3%
Eric Brakey (R)223,50235.2%
Zack Ringelstein (D)66,26810.4%
Write-in (Write-in)64
TOTAL634,409

2012 US Senator

Angus King ()370,58051.1%
Charles Summers (R)215,39929.7%
Cynthia Dill (D)92,90012.8%
Andrew Ian Dodge (L)5,624.8%
Danny Francis Dalton ()5,807.8%
Stephen Woods ()10,2891.4%
Write-in (Write-in)24,1213.3%
TOTAL724,720

Source: Ballotpedia

Finances

Source: Follow the Money

Committees

Committees

US Senate Rules and Administration
   As a member of the Senate Rules and Administration Committee, Angus is intent on working with his colleagues to eliminate inefficiencies within the Senate and improve overall government transparency. The Committee is responsible for issues that include elections, campaign finance and ethics reform. It also oversees the standing rules of the Senate and administers Congressional Office Buildings.
U.S. Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
   The Senate Select Committee on Intelligence is mandated with overseeing and studying the intelligence programs of the United States Government and to assure that those activities conform to the Constitution and the laws of United States.
U.S. Senate Committee on Armed Services
   Maine has a strong tradition of defending our Nation, and through his work on the Senate Committee on Armed Services, Angus remains deeply committed to continuing that legacy by supporting our men and women in uniform, our veterans, military units in Maine, and ensuring the longevity of our industrial base at places like Bath Iron Works and Portsmouth Naval Shipyard. These facilities not only provide strategic value to our national security, but also provide jobs that help keep Maine communities strong.
U.S. Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee
   Lowering energy costs and combating climate change are two of my priorities in the Senate, and I believe that as a nation, we don’t have to sacrifice one of those goals to accomplish the other. By harnessing the power of renewable energy sources, we can move towards a more deliberate, domestically-driven energy policy that lowers costs for people in Maine while limiting the impacts on our environment and natural resources.

Subcommittees

Subcommittee on Strategic Forces
   This subcommittee exercises jurisdiction over the budgets for nuclear and strategic forces, intelligence programs, space programs, cyber space programs, Department of Energy defense, nuclear, and environmental programs, and ballistic missile defense.
Subcommittee on Seapower
   This subcommittee exercises jurisdiction over maritime interests, including the budgets for U.S. Navy and Marine Corps procurement contracts, research, development, test, and evaluation funds, Army and Air Force strategic lift programs, and the National Defense Sealift Fund.
Airland Subcommittee
   This subcommittee oversees equipment and related research for the Air Force and Army, as well as the tactical aviation programs of the Navy and Marine Corps. It also has jurisdiction over equipment for the National Guard and Reserve. As Ranking Member, Senator King will lead the Subcommittee along with the Chairman, Senator Tom Cotton (R-Ark.).
Subcommittee on National Parks
   Angus is the Ranking Member of the Subcommittee on National Parks.

Voting Record

See: Government Page

Issues

Governance

Budget

Budgets are about priorities. They list what we care about, and in dollar amounts, they quantify how much we care. As an annual framework for federal spending and revenue levels, the budget helps chart a path toward fiscal responsibility and the overall health of our economy.  Like so many Americans, I am amazed that Congress – more often than not – chooses to run the country on short-term, haphazard budgets. Our businesses and communities cannot afford such unsustainable practices.

As a member of the Senate Budget Committee, I have been committed to working with my colleagues – from both sides of the aisle – to find solutions that chart a serious and credible path to broad-based economic growth. I have prioritized taking an evenhanded approach to budgeting, reversing sequestration cuts and their harmful effects, and establishing a smarter, more functional budget process. Responsibly confronting our long-term fiscal challenges will require a balanced approach that allows for responsible, targeted cuts to domestic discretionary spending programs; increases in new revenue; and reforms that slow the growth in programs like Medicare and Medicaid – without compromising the quality in care.

Civil Rights

Since its inception, our nation has had a long history of fighting for liberties and expanding opportunities and protections to all members of society. Ensuring all Americans, regardless of their race, gender, or sexual orientation, equal opportunities for success and happiness only serves to strengthen the very core of our country. I support equal rights and remedying existing inequities so that we can remain a model of inclusiveness and fairness. The Supreme Court decision ending discrimination against same-sex couples was fair and right, and I will continue to support equality for all Americans.

Economy

Jobs and Economy

Getting Mainers back to work, creating new jobs, and maintaining a competitive workforce are some of the greatest challenges facing our state. The key to American economic success has always been – and continues to be – our never-ending innovative spirit. For generations, small businesses and local industries have served as the lifeblood of Maine’s economy, and I am committed to making sure we are ready to confront the challenges and embrace the opportunities of the twenty-first century by promoting innovation in Maine’s traditional industries, like forestry, farming, and fishing; advancing initiatives that make it easier for Maine people to rejoin or remain in the workforce; and supporting efforts to allow workers to acquire the skills and training they need to succeed in the changing economy.

Energy

As a member of the Energy and Natural Resources Committee, I’m hard at work to create a brighter energy future for America while also protecting our environment for generations to come. I believe that our national energy policy must promote the responsible use of domestic resources in a way that promises their continued existence. Crafting such a policy requires us to recognize that there is no silver bullet, and in the near term, a “Made-in-America” strategy will require a combination of improved efficiency and smarter use of existing fuel resources alongside increased investment in renewables and the next generation of energy technologies.

I believe we need to increase our focus on domestic energy production so that we can continue to create jobs and keep our energy dollars at home. While Maine has had limited direct benefits from the traditional fossil fuel based economy, our state is well positioned to contribute to and benefit from the growing clean energy economy with our ample hydropower, wind, and biomass resources. Maine is also proud to have the first-in-the-nation tidal power turbine and soon the first floating offshore wind turbines.

An important part of building Maine’s energy future involves new technologies, like solar, wind power and battery storage, that can limit our dependence on fossil fuels, reduce the environmental footprint of our energy system, and make our energy grid more resilient and reliable.

Trade

Free Trade is only Fair Trade when applied to societies of equal political, economic, and social status. Unfortunately for Maine, our country’s free trade agreements have too often allowed new participants into our markets that are not held to the same standards and rules as Maine businesses. Over the last several decades, our trade policies have produced reverse incentives for U.S. businesses to off-shore jobs, contributing to the hollowing out of the American economy and sharp, harmful declines in U.S. manufacturing.

Traditional industries across Maine have felt acutely the negative effects of unfair free trade agreements as well as expanded international trade with increasingly competitive exporters like China. I believe that efforts to help diversify and modernize Maine’s trade-sensitive industries will continue to fall short of their full potential until we get serious about building a trade agenda that carefully and responsibly assesses how best to improve existing trade agreements and how to craft new ones; more consistently prioritizes the enforcement of our existing trade agreements; and better supports domestic industry and American exporters. To learn more about my trade priorities, please click here.

Agriculture

Agriculture has a huge historic and cultural significance to the State of Maine.  From our first settlers to the current generation of young agricultural entrepreneurs, Maine would not be what it is today without its generations of agricultural producers. Building upon the successes of this rich tradition, Maine is experiencing an exciting agricultural renaissance that is creating real opportunities for rural economic development.

Today more than 8,000 farms are working over 1.45 million acres of land and providing over $1 billion in economic activity. We are the nation’s largest producer of wild blueberries and brown eggs, and we have earned global recognition for producing the highest quality milk, cheeses, potatoes, apples, produce, maple syrup, and livestock.

To ensure the future strength and vitality of our agriculture industry, our farmers need assurances that they will not be subject to unnecessary and inappropriate regulatory burdens. Farmers also need access to broadband if they are to be able to operate their businesses efficiently and effectively – from selling products online to accessing critical information. Passing a reasonable and well balanced Farm Bill that takes into consideration the needs of each region of the country is essential, and I am working hard to ensure that all Maine farmers – from small and mid-sized operations to large commodity producers – are at the table to create sound agricultural policy.

Accompanying the abundance of produce grown in and on Maine soil is the bounty harvested from the waters of the Gulf of Maine. From our heritage in cod and other groundfish, to the iconic and booming lobster fishery and the nascent aquaculture industry, we have much to be proud of while we seek new opportunities and sustain current success. I believe we need to continue to facilitate cutting-edge science to better understand, anticipate, and adapt to changes to the marine ecosystem, help the seafood industry find and grow new markets, and continue to innovate new ways to ensure that future generations of people in Maine can thrive and make their livelihoods on the water.

Education

The twenty-first century has brought about profound changes to the ways in which we do business both at home and abroad. As information, goods, and people flow seamlessly across borders at previously unimaginable speeds, we must rethink how to best equip our students for success in this new, global job market. To that end, I have been a champion of congressional efforts to finally reauthorize and reform the badly-outdated No Child Left Behind law to ensure that Washington can be a partner, not a barrier, to innovation in the classroom. I have also worked to address the soaring cost of higher education, providing student loan borrowers with substantive debt relief and reasonable options to finance their education.

Environment

Environment and Climate Change

One of the greatest threats of our time is climate change, and as a policymaker I believe we have a duty to confront this monumental problem. That is why I consistently support policies that promote clean energy to help reduce carbon output, and I take every opportunity I can to discuss the realities of climate change science with skeptics.

I believe we have an obligation to leave our children and grandchildren a healthy and thriving planet. In addition to clean energy initiatives, I am an ardent supporter of key federal environmental programs, like the EPA’s Brownfields Program, and I have fought for sufficient funding for these programs so that they can continue to keep our country and our state clean and safe for future generations.

I am committed to protecting the integrity of Maine’s environment and that of the nation – and to providing access to it. Outdoor recreation is not only an important part of our cultural history, but it is also a pillar of our state economy. Every year people from across the country come to visit and enjoy all that Maine’s mountains, rivers, lakes, and coastal waterways have to offer, and I am committed to ensuring that this cherished tradition continues.

Health Care

Working families in Maine need affordable healthcare coverage. On average, one in five dollars every Mainer makes is spent on healthcare, which is too much. The Affordable Care Act (ACA) was passed to address this issue by aiming to provide affordable healthcare coverage for all, increasing opportunities to find better ways to pay for healthcare, and assisting employers in providing healthcare for their employees.

The ACA, along with the Medicare and Medicaid programs, are essential to delivering care in rural Maine. Healthcare and hospitals are significant job creators in our state’s economy, with hospitals being one of the four largest employers in fifteen Maine counties. Cuts to Medicare and Medicaid or the elimination of the ACA could leave tens of thousands of Mainers either dependent upon charity care or unable to access care that is in their community. Rural hospitals have clearly indicated that without a base of covered patients, they risk reducing services and staff, or even closing.

Make no mistake – I believe that healthcare is still far too expensive for far too many people and that there is a dire need to address this concern. However, the partisan bills put forward in the House and Senate in 2017 known as the American Health Care Act, Better Care Reconciliation Act, and Obamacare Repeal Reconciliation Act would have only served to make healthcare even more expensive for the people who need it most.  That is why I am working with my colleagues to set aside these partisan efforts and move forward with bipartisan improvements to lower costs and expand coverage to even more people.

Improving the public health of Mainers is another high priority for me. We all share the goal of long and healthy life, from birth through childhood to adulthood. Our investments in infants and early childhood—through programs like the Mothers, Infants, and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) Program – help start children off on the path to a long and healthy life. We also have to continue our attention to diseases like Lyme, West Nile, and Zika, working to manage the pests that spread these diseases.

The future of healthcare reform in the U.S. must focus on improved access to services and a reduction of costs. The soaring costs of healthcare in this country are not only a heavy burden on American families; they are also the primary drivers of our federal debt and deficit.

Infrastructure

Transportation, Infrastructure, and Broadband

In a rural state, connecting people to commerce can be especially difficult, so the strength of our economy and communities relies on the maintenance of our ports, roads, railways, airports, and rivers.  These resources – and others such as broadband, sewers, and utility lines – play a key role in supporting our businesses and facilitating the high standard of living that we in Maine enjoy. As we adjust to the real challenges of global climate change, we will need not just to maintain but to improve our infrastructure in order to protect Maine from seawater incursion on our coasts and islands, increased wear on our transportation networks, and defense against extreme weather events. Our state—and our country— incur a debt when we postpone investments in our transportation and infrastructure systems. Preserving and improving our state’s infrastructure and transportation systems is an essential component of any long term path to economic prosperity, and I am committed to supporting projects that keep Maine moving forward.

Increasing access to high-speed broadband, both fixed and wireless, is also key to ensuring our ability to compete in today’s global economy, and it is critical that we continue to invest in next generation broadband networks to advance innovation in education, health care, agriculture, and opportunities for entrepreneurs in Maine, regardless of where one lives. I have outlined a roadmap to help meet the broadband challenges faced in Maine and across the country, including steps to better connect rural communities and close the digital divide.

Social Security

Social Security and Medicare are two of the most successful and popular programs in our country’s history. Together they help to keep millions of Americans healthy and prevent them from falling into poverty.  I am committed to finding sensible, long-term solutions to ensure that these essential programs remain viable and available for generations to come. Supporting improved health outcomes for America’s seniors also involves helping them “age with options” – tearing down barriers they might face to aging safely in their homes and communities and helping to reduce the incidence of falls within the home. From introducing bills to increase access to federal home modification resources to supporting legislation that would make it more affordable for family caregivers to support aging loved ones, I am working hard to advance priorities that better support Maine’s vibrant senior population.

Veterans

The courageous men and women who serve in our armed forces have made countless personal sacrifices in the protection of the freedoms we enjoy today. I am proud that Maine is home to one of the highest percentages of veterans per capita in country. We have an obligation to ensure that these brave patriots have access to timely, quality care. In 2014, I strongly supported efforts to reform the Department of Veterans Affairs and better serve those who served us. We must not only fulfill our promise to care for those who have “borne the battle” and their families, but as a new generation of Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, Marines, and Coast Guardsmen transition to civilian life, we must also secure their continued access to the employment, health, housing, and education services that they deserve.

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