Jared GoldenJared Golden – ME2

Current Position: US Representative since 2019
Affiliation: Democrat
Candidate: 2021 US Representative
Former Position(s): State Delegate from 2014 – 2018

Other Positions:  
Chair, Underserved, Agricultural, and Rural Business Development Subcommittee.

Quotes: 
Proud to work with @SenatorCollins
to get this bill across the finish line. $200 million in relief funds will be available for loggers and log haulers in ME and across the USA starting Thursday. We’re ready to work with Maine loggers to apply for this program. #mepolitics

Featured Video: 
Jared Golden: A personal look at Maine’s CD-2 Congressman

Source: Government page

The House Armed Services Committee (HASC) approved its annual defense authorization bill early this morning, including a number of provisions secured by Congressman Jared Golden (ME-02) to protect Maine’s shipbuilders at Bath Iron Works (BIW) and the future shipbuilding workforce, bolster national defense, and support American service members.

Critically, the FY2022 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) passed by HASC includes a Golden measure that would authorize the Navy to begin a new multi-year procurement contract for up to 15 DDG-51 destroyers — the ships built at BIW— and to build three DDG-51 ships in 2022.

Summary

Current Position: US Representative since 2019
Affiliation: Democrat
Candidate: 2021 US Representative
Former Position(s): State Delegate from 2014 – 2018

Other Positions:  
Chair, Underserved, Agricultural, and Rural Business Development Subcommittee.

Quotes: 
Proud to work with @SenatorCollins
to get this bill across the finish line. $200 million in relief funds will be available for loggers and log haulers in ME and across the USA starting Thursday. We’re ready to work with Maine loggers to apply for this program. #mepolitics

Featured Video: 
Jared Golden: A personal look at Maine’s CD-2 Congressman

Source: Government page

News

The House Armed Services Committee (HASC) approved its annual defense authorization bill early this morning, including a number of provisions secured by Congressman Jared Golden (ME-02) to protect Maine’s shipbuilders at Bath Iron Works (BIW) and the future shipbuilding workforce, bolster national defense, and support American service members.

Critically, the FY2022 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) passed by HASC includes a Golden measure that would authorize the Navy to begin a new multi-year procurement contract for up to 15 DDG-51 destroyers — the ships built at BIW— and to build three DDG-51 ships in 2022.

Twitter

About

Jared Golden 1

Source: Government page

Jared Golden represents the Second District of Maine in the United States Congress, where he serves on the Small Business Committee and the Armed Services Committee.

He grew up in Leeds, a small town in Androscoggin County. After enlisting as an infantryman in the Marines, Golden deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan before returning home to Maine.

Congressman Golden currently lives in Lewiston with his wife Isobel.

Committees

Congressman Jared Golden serves on the House Armed Services Committee. He serves on the Seapower and Projection Forces Subcommittee and the Readiness Subcommittee.

He also serves on the House Small Business Committee. He is the Chairman of the Underserved, Agricultural, and Rural Business Development Subcommittee.

Caucuses 

  • ALS Caucus
  • Appalachian Trail Caucus
  • Arts Caucus
  • Boating Caucus
  • Construction Procurement Caucus
  • Gaming Caucus
  • End Corruption Caucus
  • Humanities Caucus
  • LGBT Equality Caucus
  • Military Mental Health Task Force
  • National Service Caucus
  • Native American Caucus
  • Navy and Marine Corps Caucus
  • Organic Caucus
  • Paper and Packaging Caucus
  • Primary Care Caucus
  • Shipbuilding Caucus
  • Small Brewers Caucus
  • Sportsmen’s Caucus
  • Working Forests Caucus

Sponsored Legislation

CONGRESS.GOV 

Offices

District Offices

Washington, DC Office

1222 Longworth HOB
WashingtonDC 20515

(202) 225-6306
Fax: (202) 225-2943

Washington, DC Office

1222 Longworth HOB
WashingtonDC 20515

(202) 225-6306
Fax: (202) 225-2943

Experience

Education

Contact

Email:

Offices

Bangor, Maine Office
6 State Street
Suite 101
Bangor, ME 04401
Phone: (207) 249-7400

Caribou, Maine Office
7 Hatch Drive
Suite 230
Caribou, ME 04736
Phone: (207) 492-6009

Lewiston, Maine Office
179 Lisbon Street
Lewiston, ME 04240
Phone: (207) 241-6767
Fax: (207) 241-6770

Web

Government Page, Twitter, YouTube, Facebook

Politics

Source: none

Campaign Finance

Open Secrets

Voting Record

Vote Smart

Search

Google

Wikipedia Entry

Jared Forrest Golden (born July 25, 1982) is an American politician serving as the U.S. Representative for Maine’s 2nd congressional district since 2019. A member of the Democratic Party, his district, the largest east of the Mississippi River, covers the northern four-fifths of the state, including Lewiston, Bangor and Auburn. Golden is the first member of Congress elected by ranked-choice voting.[1] He was deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan as a United States Marine.

Early life and education

Golden was born in Lewiston and raised in Leeds.[2] He attended Leavitt Area High School. Golden enrolled as a student at the University of Maine at Farmington but left after one year to join the United States Marine Corps in 2002. He served combat tours in Iraq and Afghanistan.[3][4]

After returning home to Maine, Golden attended Bates College, graduating with a degree in history and politics.[5] He went on to work for an international logistics firm and then for Maine’s Republican Senator Susan Collins on the Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee.[6][4]

Maine House of Representatives

Golden returned to Maine in 2013 to work for the House Democratic Office in the Maine Legislature. As a Democrat, Golden ran for and was elected to the Maine House of Representatives in 2014, representing part of the city of Lewiston. He was reelected in 2016. In the subsequent legislative session, Golden became Assistant House Majority Leader.[3] Golden chaired the Elections committee and the Joint Select Committee on Joint Rules.[7]

U.S. House of Representatives

Elections

2018

On August 24, 2017, Golden announced his candidacy against Bruce Poliquin to serve in the United States House of Representatives for Maine’s 2nd congressional district.[3] On June 20, 2018, he was declared the winner of the Democratic primary, defeating environmentalist Lucas St. Clair and bookstore owner Craig Olson.[8]

On election night, Golden trailed Poliquin by 2,000 votes. As neither candidate won a majority, Maine’s newly implemented ranked-choice voting system called for the votes of independents Tiffany Bond and William Hoar to be redistributed to Poliquin or Golden in accordance with their voters’ second choice. Exit polls indicated that 90% of the independents’ supporters ranked Golden as their second choice, which on paper was enough to give Golden the victory.[9] The independents’ supporters ranked Golden as their second choice by an overwhelming margin, allowing him to defeat Poliquin by 3,000 votes after the final tabulation.[10] He is the first challenger to unseat an incumbent in the district since 1916.[11]

Poliquin opposed the use of ranked-choice voting in the election and claimed to be the winner due to his first-round lead. He filed a lawsuit in federal court to have ranked-choice voting declared unconstitutional and be declared the winner. Judge Lance E. Walker rejected all of Poliquin’s arguments and upheld the certified results.[12] Poliquin appealed to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit and requested an order to prevent Golden from being certified as the winner, but the request was rejected.[13] On December 24, Poliquin dropped his lawsuit, allowing Golden to take the seat.[14]

2020

Golden ran for reelection in 2020 and won the Democratic primary unopposed. His Republican opponent was Dale Crafts, a former Maine Representative. Most political pundits expected Golden to win the general election easily; polling showed him ahead of Crafts by an average of about 19%, Sabato’s Crystal Ball and The Cook Political Report both rating the contest as “Likely Democratic”, and data company FiveThirtyEight predicted that Golden had a 96 out of a 100 chance of winning, with Golden garnering nearly 57% of the vote in their projection of the most likely scenario.[15][16][17][18]

In November, Golden defeated Crafts 53%-47%, a closer margin than expected.[19] President Donald Trump carried the district in that same election.[20]

Tenure

Golden was sworn in on January 3, 2019. During the election for Speaker of the House, he voted against Democratic Caucus nominee Nancy Pelosi, as he had pledged to do during his campaign, instead voting for Representative Cheri Bustos of Illinois.[21] On December 18, 2019, Golden voted for Article I of the articles of impeachment against Donald Trump but was one of three Democrats to vote against Article II.[22]

On February 6, 2020, Golden endorsed Senator Michael Bennet of Colorado for president during the 2020 Democratic Party presidential primaries.[23]

As of September 2021, Golden had voted in line with Joe Biden‘s stated position 81.3% of the time.[24]

Political positions

Build Back Better

Golden was the lone House Democrat to vote against the Build Back Better Act, citing concerns about tax cuts that would benefit the wealthy.[25]

Guns

Golden was the only Democrat to vote against the Bipartisan Background Checks Act of 2021 to expand background checks on gun purchases and one of two Democrats, along with Ron Kind of Wisconsin, to vote against the Enhanced Background Checks Act of 2021, designed to close the so-called Charleston loophole. Both bills passed the House in March 2021.[26]

Stimulus

Golden was one of two Democrats, alongside Kurt Schrader of Oregon, to vote against the first version of the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021, a stimulus bill intended to address the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and the resultant economic fallout.[27] He cited concerns such as broad eligibility for $1,400 stimulus checks and high levels of public debt, saying, “At some point, the bill has to come due.”[28]

Committee assignments

Caucus memberships

Electoral history

Maine’s 2nd congressional district, 2018 Democratic primary elections results[33]
PartyCandidateRound 1Round 3
Votes%TransferVotes% (gross)% (net)
DemocraticJared Golden20,98746.4%+2,62423,61152.2%54.3%
DemocraticLucas St. Clair17,74239.2%+2,11119,85343.9%45.7%
DemocraticCraig Olson3,9938.8%-3,993Eliminated
DemocraticJonathan Fulford2,4895.5%-2,489Eliminated
Total active votes45,211100%43,464100.0%
Exhausted ballots+1,7471,7473.9%
Total votes45,211100%45,211100.0%

% (gross) = percent of all valid votes cast (without eliminating the exhausted votes)

% (net) = percent of votes cast after eliminating the exhausted votes

Maine’s 2nd congressional district, 2018 general elections[34]
PartyCandidateRound 1Round 3
Votes%TransferVotes% (gross)% (net)
DemocraticJared Golden132,01345.6%+ 10,427142,44049.18%50.62%
RepublicanBruce Poliquin (incumbent)134,18446.3%+ 4,747138,93147.97%49.38%
IndependentTiffany Bond16,5525.7%– 16,552Eliminated
IndependentWill Hoar6,8752.4%– 6,875Eliminated
Total active votes289,624100%281,371100%
Exhausted ballots+8,2538,2532.85%
Total votes289,624100%289,624100%

% (gross) = percent of all valid votes cast (without eliminating the exhausted votes)

% (net) = percent of votes cast after eliminating the exhausted votes

Maine’s 2nd congressional district, 2020[35]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Jared Golden (incumbent) 197,974 53.0
RepublicanDale Crafts175,22847.0
Write-in330.0
Total votes373,235 100.0
Democratic hold

Personal life

Golden’s wife Isobel (née Moiles) served as a city councilor in Lewiston from 2016 to 2018.[36][37] They have a daughter who was born in May 2021.[38]

References

  1. ^ Lessig, Lawrence (November 16, 2018). “Ranked-choice voting worked in Maine. Now we should use it in presidential races”. USA Today. Retrieved November 18, 2018.
  2. ^ Collins, Steve (September 9, 2018). “Jared Golden: From combat to candidate for Congress”. Sun Journal. Retrieved September 10, 2018.
  3. ^ a b c Thistle, Scott (August 24, 2017). “Jared Golden, a leading Democrat in Maine House, announces run for U.S. Congress”. Portland Press Herald. Retrieved June 13, 2018.
  4. ^ a b Collins, Steve (September 9, 2018). “Jared Golden: From combat to candidate for Congress”. Sun Journal. Retrieved September 27, 2018.
  5. ^ Shepherd, Michael (August 24, 2017). “Poliquin may have to beat a Marine veteran to keep his seat”. Bangor Daily News. Retrieved June 13, 2018.
  6. ^ “Jared Golden calls himself a veteran who still wants to serve”. Sun Journal. August 23, 2017. Retrieved June 13, 2018.
  7. ^ “Member Profile – Historical View”. The Maine House of Representatives. Retrieved April 11, 2021.
  8. ^ Collins, Steve (June 20, 2018). “Democrat Jared Golden declared winner of congressional primary”. Sun Journal. Retrieved June 30, 2018.
  9. ^ Bill Nemitz (November 11, 2018). “Poliquin faces uphill battle for House seat”. =Portland Press Herald.
  10. ^ “Jared Golden declared winner of first ranked-choice congressional election, but challenge looms”. Portland Press Herald. November 15, 2018. Retrieved November 16, 2018.
  11. ^ Taylor, Kate; Stack, Liam (November 15, 2018). “Maine’s Bruce Poliquin, Lone Republican in House From New England, Loses Re-election”. The New York Times.
  12. ^ Collins, Steve (December 13, 2018). “Federal court rules against Bruce Poliquin’s challenge of ranked-choice voting”. Sun Journal. Retrieved December 19, 2018.
  13. ^ Mistler, Steve. “Poliquin’s Request To Block Certification Of 2nd District Election”. Maine Public. Retrieved December 21, 2018.
  14. ^ Murphy, Edward (December 24, 2018). “Poliquin drops challenge to ranked-choice voting, clearing way for Golden to take seat in Congress”. Portland Press Herald. Retrieved December 25, 2018.
  15. ^ “Maine’s Second District – Crafts vs. Golden”. RealClearPolitics. November 3, 2020. Retrieved February 11, 2021.
  16. ^ “2020 House race ratings”. Sabato’s Crystal Ball. November 2, 2020. Retrieved February 11, 2021.
  17. ^ “2020 House race ratings”. The Cook Political Report. November 2, 2020. Retrieved February 11, 2021.
  18. ^ “Golden is clearly favored to win Maine’s 2nd District”. FiveThirtyEight. November 3, 2020. Retrieved February 11, 2021.
  19. ^ “Maine Election Results: Second Congressional District”. The New York Times. February 11, 2021.
  20. ^ “Trump holds electoral vote in northern Maine”. Politico. January 6, 2021.
  21. ^ “Maine’s new Rep. Golden votes against Pelosi for House speaker”. Portland Press Herald. Associated Press. January 3, 2019. Retrieved January 3, 2019.
  22. ^ Foran, Clare; Byrd, Haley (December 18, 2019). “Democrat to split his vote on impeachment articles”. CNN. Retrieved December 19, 2019.
  23. ^ Cadelago, Christopher; Mutnick, Ally (February 6, 2020). “Michael Bennet’s first House endorsement is from Trump Country”. Politico. Retrieved February 6, 2020.
  24. ^ Bycoffe, Anna Wiederkehr and Aaron (April 22, 2021). “Does Your Member Of Congress Vote With Or Against Biden?”. FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved September 14, 2021.
  25. ^ Choi, Joseph (November 19, 2021). “Jared Golden sole Democrat to vote against Build Back Better Act”. The Hill.
  26. ^ Conradis, Brandon (March 11, 2021). “The eight Republicans who voted to tighten background checks on guns”. The Hill. Retrieved March 12, 2021.
  27. ^ “H.R. 1319: American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 — House Vote #49 — Feb 27, 2021”. GovTrack. February 27, 2021. Retrieved February 27, 2021.
  28. ^ “Golden Statement on Vote Against $1.9 Trillion Legislative Package”. Representative Jared Golden. February 27, 2021.
  29. ^ “Committees and Caucuses”. Representative Jared Golden. December 13, 2012. Retrieved January 30, 2021.
  30. ^ “Members”. Blue Dog Coalition. Retrieved December 23, 2018.
  31. ^ “For Country Caucus Announces Chairs, Members for 117th Congress”. Representative Jared Golden. February 25, 2021. Retrieved April 29, 2021.
  32. ^ “Featured Members”. Problem Solvers Caucus. Retrieved March 28, 2021.
  33. ^ “Tabulations for Elections held in 2018”. www.maine.gov. Bureau of Corporations, Elections & Commissions, Elections and Voting, Tabulations. June 12, 2018. Retrieved February 6, 2020.
  34. ^ “Results Certified to the Governor 11/26/18”. www.maine.gov. Retrieved December 14, 2018.
  35. ^ “November 3, 2020 General Election”. Maine Department of Secretary of State. Retrieved November 24, 2020.
  36. ^ Collins, Steve (August 23, 2017). “Lewiston’s Jared Golden takes aim at congressional seat”. Sun Journal. Retrieved June 12, 2018.
  37. ^ “Moiles — Golden”. Sun Journal. October 19, 2014.
  38. ^ Press, The Associated (May 16, 2021). “Jared Golden welcomes daughter”. Bangor Daily News. Retrieved June 14, 2021.

External links

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by

Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Maine’s 2nd congressional district

2019–present
Incumbent
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by

United States representatives by seniority
315th
Succeeded by


Recent Elections

2018 US Representative

Jared Golden (D)142,44050.6%
Bruce Poliquin (R)138,93149.4%
TOTAL281,371

Source: Ballotpedia

Finances

GOLDEN, JARED F has run in 4 races for public office, winning 3 of them. The candidate has raised a total of $7,835,528.

Source: Follow the Money

Committees

Committees

House Armed Services Committee
House Small Business Committee

Subcommittees

Seapower and Projection Forces Subcommittee
Tactical Air and Land Forces Subcommittee

Voting Record

See: Vote Smart

Issues

Governance

Good Government & Clean Elections

Jared believes our government should work for regular Mainers, not corporations, special interests, or the wealthy. He’s fighting to restore faith and trust in our democracy by getting money out of politics and ensuring public officials act in the public good.

One of the first bills Jared cosponsored when he arrived in Congress was H.R. 1, the For the People Act. The For the People Act is the most sweeping democracy reform to pass the House in decades and includes legislation to shine a light on dark money, help more Americans exercise their right to vote, and ensure government officials act in the public interest. The bill also contains provisions that would strengthen election systems from foreign interference and expand prohibitions on foreign political donations.

In March, Jared helped pass H.R. 1 through the House and secured an amendment in the legislation to set tougher restrictions for candidates utilizing a new matching funds system (similar to the Clean Elections system we have in Maine). He has also voted for legislation that would harden America’s defenses against election interference by foreign countries and make it more difficult for foreign entities to spend money to influence elections. Jared will continue to take action to defend American democracy and make government work for the people.

Education

Education

No matter where in the state they live or how much money their family makes, Maine kids deserve a high-quality education. This work has never been more important: Maine’s workforce is aging rapidly, creating a skills and workforce shortage. Jared recognizes the urgent need to prepare Mainers to address these shortages and ready the next generations with the skills required to stay in Maine and take good jobs.

That means providing schools, particularly in rural areas, with the resources they need to be successful. Teachers are some of the most valuable public servants in Maine. They should not have to struggle to make ends meet and they should have the freedom to teach rather than devoting all their time to testing. Earlier this year, Jared voted to boost funding for K-12 education and provide more support for special education programs across the country.

Many of the dependable, middle-class jobs in Maine don’t require a four year degree. Industries like shipbuilding and forest products need workers with specialized technical skills. Jared believes we need to improve the pathways to these jobs with better access to training programs and more support for apprenticeships. Jared has stood up against changes that would hurt successful apprenticeship programs. He also passed legislation through the House that directs the Navy to develop and implement a plan to train the workforce necessary for its growing fleet at Bath Iron Works and other shipyards.

Jared knows many Mainers struggle under the weight of student loans, stifling their ability to buy a house, start a family, or launch a business. He’s working to help make higher education more affordable for regular folks. Student loan debt in our state has doubled in the last decade, averaging about $30,000 for recent graduates. These are pressures that older generations just didn’t have to deal with and they keep young Mainers from contributing to their local economies, buying houses, having children, and often pushes them to leave the state in search of higher pay. Jared voted to expand Pell Grants, our country’s largest financial aid program. He is also a cosponsor of the What You Can Do For Your Country Act, which improves the Public Service Loan Forgiveness program so that teachers, nurses, first responders, and other professions designed to serve their communities can have their loans forgiven after a decade of service.

Environment

Energy & Environment

Maine’s natural environment is our state’s most important resource. Our oceans and forests power our economy and support hundreds of thousands of jobs in our state thanks to Maine’s long, proud tradition of sustainable fishing, forestry, agriculture, and land conservation. We manage our resources responsibly so that they’re there for future generations. Jared is working to carry on that important legacy.

Climate change is the greatest environmental challenge of our time. Jared believes it presents a unique and pressing threat to homes, jobs, and entire industries across our state, as well as our national security. He has pushed for our country to rejoin the Paris Climate Agreement and he voted to pass the Climate Action Now Act, which would direct the administration to begin the decisive, comprehensive actions necessary to address climate change.

Maine’s potential to spur economic growth, create jobs in rural areas, and combat climate change through solar, wind, and biomass energy production is unparalleled in the Northeastern US. Jared is working to pave the way for these industries to flourish and support jobs here in Maine with legislation like the BTU Act, which would incentivize the use of biomass for affordable, energy- efficient heating in homes and businesses and help grow Maine’s forest products industry. Jared is working to help Maine take advantage of its potential for wind and solar energy through tax credits and other policies.

Like most Mainers, Jared grew up with a love of the outdoors and our state’s mountains, woods, rivers, and coastline. He is committed to protecting Maine’s national parks and other public lands and ensuring that future generations of Mainers can continue to hunt, fish, hike, and enjoy our state’s natural beauty. Jared has voted to ban drilling for oil and gas off the coast of Maine and to reauthorize the Land and Water Conservation Fund, one of our country’s most important conservation programs.

Health Care

Health Care

More than any other issue, Mainers tell Jared about how much they struggle with the high cost of health care. Americans spend twice as much on health care as other advanced countries, but we still receive worse health outcomes. Whether it’s unaffordable insurance premiums, the skyrocketing cost of medication, or an hours-long drive to see an expensive specialist, it’s clear our health care system is broken.

Jared believes our country needs to move towards a universal coverage system that makes health care affordable for every Mainer. We won’t get there overnight, so Jared is working right now to defend protections for Americans with pre-existing conditions, lower costs by making improvements to the Affordable Care Act (ACA), and help more Mainers receive health care coverage by protecting Medicaid and Medicare.

One of the biggest reasons Mainers struggle to afford their care is the ever-increasing cost of prescription drugs. At a time when drug corporations are raking in profits, millions of Americans can’t afford the medications they need. That’s why one of the first bills Jared introduced was the FLAT Prices Act, which punishes pharmaceutical companies for spiking the prices of their drugs. He’s also cosponsored important bills to allow Americans to import safe, affordable drugs from Canada, give Medicare the power to negotiate lower drug prices for seniors and millions of other Americans, and cap out-of-pocket prescription drug costs for seniors.

Jared knows many Mainers work with their hands and it takes a toll on their bodies over a long career. That’s why he supports legislation to allow Americans between the ages of 50 and 64 to buy into Medicare. People who buy into the new plan could reduce their annual premiums by thousands of dollars, crucial progress for middle-aged Maine people who face rising healthcare costs but are not yet of retirement age.

Infrastructure

Infrastructure

When Jared asks small business owners, town managers, and other Mainers working to create jobs and develop our state’s economy about their most pressing needs, rebuilding Maine’s infrastructure is almost always high on the list. Investing in infrastructure creates jobs, boosts local economies, and helps our rural communities thrive. Jared serves as Chairman of the House Small Business Subcommittee on Contracting and Infrastructure, leading the committee’s work to rebuild American infrastructure.

As one of the most rural states in the country, we know better than most the impact that deteriorating roads, rail, and other infrastructure have on our daily lives. For many Mainers, it means thousands of dollars in car repairs and lost wages thanks to delays or closures. For businesses large and small, it means higher costs, late shipments, and other issues that put them at a competitive disadvantage.

In an increasingly dysfunctional and partisan Washington, improving America’s infrastructure is one of the few issues that both Republicans and Democrats claim is a priority. Jared has pushed for both parties to back up their words with actions and work across the aisle on a strong infrastructure bill that finally makes the investment we need in roads, bridges, and rail. As an infrastructure bill takes shape, Jared will work to ensure that any legislation doesn’t disadvantage cash-poor states like Maine against populous, cash-rich states like New York, Massachusetts, and California.

Jared understands that broadband internet access is one of the most significant infrastructure challenges holding back many rural communities and small businesses. He’s made expanding rural broadband a priority in his first year in Congress. In September, Jared brought a congressional hearing to Machias to learn from the small broadband providers working to expand broadband to rural communities Down East about the challenges they’re facing.

Safety

National Security and Servicemembers

After 9/11, Jared answered the call to serve our country and enlisted in the Marines, deploying overseas to both Iraq and Afghanistan. He knows firsthand the consequences of sending our troops into foreign conflicts without a clear, well-articulated strategy for their mission and their withdrawal. He uses his experience as a Marine combat veteran when confronted with national security decisions in Congress.

As a member of the House Armed Services Committee, Jared works across the aisle to create policies that keep America safe and ensure that our servicemembers have the training and tools they need to fight for our country.

Jared believes we need to reevaluate the use of the American military in foreign conflicts and strike a pragmatic balance: we must be clear-eyed about the consequences of withdrawing our troops from strategically important regions in the fight against terrorism, like Afghanistan, Iraq, and Syria, while acknowledging that nation-building and long, protracted wars are not in our country’s best interests.

Earlier this year, Jared voted to affirm Congress’ authority under the War Powers Resolution and prevent the administration from a military attack on Iran unless authorized by Congress. He also voted to repeal the 2002 Authorized Use of Military Force (AUMF) against Iraq, which provided the Bush Administration with authority to attack Iraq during the reign of Saddam Hussein. The Iraq AUMF has been rendered obsolete and is not needed by the Pentagon to conduct current military operations.

Jared deeply respects Maine’s servicemembers and also knows many civilian Mainers play a critically important role in our national defense as well. Thousands perform vital defense work in our state, including building the finest warships on the planet at Bath Iron Works and defense research at our universities. Jared uses his position on the Armed Services Committee to support these institutions and their workers at the federal level, ensuring that they have access to the resources they need and helping create a level playing field to compete for federal contracts.

Veterans

Veterans

Maine has a long, proud tradition of military service. More than one in ten Mainers is a veteran, and Jared is one of them. He understands the sacrifices veterans and their families have made for our country and he’s working hard to make sure they receive the benefits they’ve earned. In Congress, Jared’s focused on improving the health care veterans receive at the VA, helping them transition from active duty to civilian life, and connecting them with resources they can use to get a good job, receive an education, and start a business.

When he returned home from deployment, Jared was diagnosed with post-traumatic stress. He was lucky: he had a support system and was able to get the care he needed. Jared knows that for many veterans with mental health challenges, that isn’t the case. He’s committed to strengthening mental health care for all veterans in Maine. That’s why he’s leading efforts to expand mental health care at Togus to allow long-term mental health patients to stay in Maine to receive treatment rather than be sent out of state. Earlier this year, he successfully passed a provision through the House to increase the amount of funding provided for veterans’ long-term mental health care across the country.

Jared believes the VA provides critical services to Maine veterans and that the VA should not be privatized and handed over to big corporations looking to squeeze out big profits. He knows that the VA isn’t without significant problems, but he believes that those problems are best solved by conducting effective oversight and providing the agency with necessary resources. Earlier this year, Jared helped pass a bill through the House to expand the services available to Vietnam war veterans who were exposed to Agent Orange while serving off-shore. Jared will continue to hold the VA accountable and ensure Maine veterans receive the high quality care they’ve earned.

Opioids

The opioid epidemic is devastating in Maine. In 2018, opioid overdose deaths declined for the first time since the beginning of the decade, but still claimed the lives of 354 of our friends, family, and neighbors. Thousands more remain addicted and need treatment.

This is a crisis that will have long-lasting impacts and Jared believes we must do everything in our power to fight back against opioid addiction and abuse in Maine and throughout the country. One of his first acts in Congress was to call on congressional leaders to make combating the opioid crisis a priority. Jared is also a member of the House Opioid Task Force.

Jared knows that addressing the opioid crisis requires a comprehensive approach, including prevention, treatment, recovery, and law enforcement. State and local agencies are working hard in all of these areas, but they can’t do it alone. The federal government must step up to the plate and tackle the fight against opioid use disorder head-on.

That’s why Jared’s fighting back against efforts to roll back Medicaid, the largest source of coverage for treatment services to Americans struggling with opioid addiction. He’s also working to expand the resources available to communities deeply affected by the crisis. Jared is a cosponsor of the Comprehensive Addiction Resources Emergency (CARE) Act, which would make grants to fight substance use disorder and the opioid epidemic available to the Maine communities hardest hit by these drugs.

Small Business

Jared grew up working on his family’s small business in Leeds, Maine and learning from his parents about the hard work it takes to keep a small business going these days. He knows small businesses are especially important to us in Maine, particularly in rural areas. From lobster boats to dairy farms to the remaining shops that line Main Street in towns across the state, Mainers have a proud legacy of independent, family-owned businesses that we must fight to preserve.

Small businesses provide more than half of the jobs in our state. So when Jared arrived in Congress, he sought out a position on the House Small Business Committee, where he can work directly on the issues that affect Maine small businesses. Jared leads the committee’s work to improve infrastructure for small businesses across the country and help them compete for federal contracts as chairman of the Subcommittee on Contracting and Infrastructure. As part of this work, Jared passed a bill through the House to reauthorize and expand the Small Business Development Center program, which provides low- or no-cost business counseling and training at 11 locations throughout the Second District to help Mainers launch or grow their small businesses.

Since taking office in January, Jared has been travelling the Second District meeting with small businesses and convening roundtables with small business owners to learn what they need to succeed and grow. He’s focused on making Washington work for Maine small businesses and connecting them with the resources they need to be successful: capital and grant opportunities, business training, advising, mentoring services, and other programs designed to help them grow and create jobs. In September, Jared brought a congressional hearing to Machias, Maine to learn from small broadband providers and municipal leaders about the challenges they face bringing broadband to rural communities Down East.

Small businesses have told Jared that Congress needs to take action to improve our roads, rails, bridges, and other infrastructure. That includes finally making progress on rural broadband, one issue that small businesses struggle with regardless of industry. Jared knows Maine small businesses also need qualified, experienced workers, and he’s working to meet that need by improving the skills of Maine’s workforce through training and apprenticeship programs. He understands that Washington regulations often hold Maine small businesses back, and he looks to cut red tape when regulations don’t make sense for Maine.

Maine’s Heritage Industries

Maine’s economy and culture are tied to our heritage industries – fishing, logging, shipbuilding, farming, and others – and they provide thousands of Mainers with good-paying jobs. These industries are the bedrock of many communities in Maine, particularly in rural areas. They rely on a skilled workforce, responsible use of our state’s abundant natural resources, and the hard work of generations of Mainers.

Jared has worked hard to make sure he understands the challenges Mainers working in these industries face. He’s traveled to farms throughout the Second District to learn from a wide variety of farmers about what they need to be successful and how he can help connect them with resources. Thousands of Mainers in the Second District build ships at Bath Iron Works and Jared has met them at the South Gate, in the union halls, and in the shipyard. Jared has used his position on the House Armed Services Committee to help protect these good shipbuilding jobs and ensure our country’s finest warships are ‘Bath-built, best-built’ far into the future.

When new proposed regulations threatened the livelihoods of Maine lobstermen earlier this year, Jared led the Maine delegation in speaking out. Since then, he has worked closely with the lobstering community to ensure the regulations are based on the best available evidence and don’t unfairly target lobstermen. He proposed a bold amendment to block the regulations until the underlying data had undergone a scientific peer review process. He also led the delegation to urge the president to intervene directly. Jared will continue to stand up for lobstermen and push back against misguided, burdensome regulations.

Each of Maine’s heritage industries is changing. Jared is focused on making sure the next generation of fishermen, loggers, shipbuilders, and farmers can count on stable jobs that support their families. He’s focused on opening up new markets to Maine products, addressing workforce shortages and preparing young Mainers to work in these fields, and fighting federal regulations that don’t work for Maine.

X
Chellie PingreeChellie Pingree – ME1

Current Position: US Representative since 2008
Affiliation: Democrat
Candidate: 2021 US Representative
Former Position(s): State Senator from 1992 – 2000

Other Positions:  
Chair, Subcommittee on Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies – Appropriations

Quotes: 
In Maine, VT, and DC, incarcerated people are allowed to vote and our democracy is stronger for it!   Today @EleanorNorton & I intro’d a bill to provide people in prison w/ info on how they can register & vote absentee. We must break down all barriers to the ballot box!

Featured Video: 
Why food policy is worth fighting for: Chellie Pingree at TEDxManhattan

Source: Campaign page

Congresswoman Chellie Pingree (D-Maine), a member of the House Agriculture Committee, today called the panel’s markup of the agriculture provisions of the $3.5 trillion budget reconciliation legislation a “win” for climate research, renewable energy, and the nation’s forests. The bill specifically includes $7.75 billion for climate-focused agricultural research; $18.69 billion for rural development and renewable energy; and $40 billion to increase forest resilience in the face of climate change, reduce wildfire risk, and enhance carbon sequestration.

“Thanks to our committee this budget reconciliation bill will include an unprecedented investment in climate research, forest resilience, and on-farm renewable energy. These are long overdue investments that will create green jobs, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, sequester more carbon in our forests, and empower American farmers, ranchers, and foresters with the research and technology they need to address climate change. I am extremely proud that the reconciliation bill includes key tenets of my Agriculture Resilience ActRural Forest Markets Act, and Community Wood Facilities Assistance Act all of which I wrote to support farmers and foresters in the fight against climate change,” said Congresswoman Pingree.

Summary

Current Position: US Representative since 2008
Affiliation: Democrat
Candidate: 2021 US Representative
Former Position(s): State Senator from 1992 – 2000

Other Positions:  
Chair, Subcommittee on Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies – Appropriations

Quotes: 
In Maine, VT, and DC, incarcerated people are allowed to vote and our democracy is stronger for it!   Today @EleanorNorton & I intro’d a bill to provide people in prison w/ info on how they can register & vote absentee. We must break down all barriers to the ballot box!

Featured Video: 
Why food policy is worth fighting for: Chellie Pingree at TEDxManhattan

Source: Campaign page

News

Congresswoman Chellie Pingree (D-Maine), a member of the House Agriculture Committee, today called the panel’s markup of the agriculture provisions of the $3.5 trillion budget reconciliation legislation a “win” for climate research, renewable energy, and the nation’s forests. The bill specifically includes $7.75 billion for climate-focused agricultural research; $18.69 billion for rural development and renewable energy; and $40 billion to increase forest resilience in the face of climate change, reduce wildfire risk, and enhance carbon sequestration.

“Thanks to our committee this budget reconciliation bill will include an unprecedented investment in climate research, forest resilience, and on-farm renewable energy. These are long overdue investments that will create green jobs, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, sequester more carbon in our forests, and empower American farmers, ranchers, and foresters with the research and technology they need to address climate change. I am extremely proud that the reconciliation bill includes key tenets of my Agriculture Resilience ActRural Forest Markets Act, and Community Wood Facilities Assistance Act all of which I wrote to support farmers and foresters in the fight against climate change,” said Congresswoman Pingree.

Twitter

About

Chellie Pingree 1

Source: Government page

Chellie Pingree never anticipated a life in politics. Living on the offshore island of North Haven, Maine, she raised her kids and ran a small business. She served on the school board and as the local tax assessor, a job no one else in town wanted. But in 1991, when she was approached about running for State Senate, she jumped at the chance.

She scored a remarkable upset, defeating a popular Republican, and went on to serve four terms in the Maine Senate. But throughout her political career, from Augusta to Washington and beyond, the lessons she learned on North Haven have always been her guide: Be accountable to your neighbors, and always use your common sense.

Chellie Johnson (she has legally changed her name from “Rochelle”) was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota, in 1955, the youngest of four children. Her father, Harry, worked in advertising and her mother, Dorothy, was a nurse. Chellie moved to Maine as a teenager, attended the University of Southern Maine, and graduated from the College of the Atlantic, in Bar Harbor. After college, she moved to North Haven, an island town of 350 people twelve miles off the coast of Rockland, to raise her family and make a living.

Committees

House Committee on Appropriations

  • Subcommittee on Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies
  • Chair, Subcommittee on Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies
  • Subcommittee on Military Construction and Veterans Affairs

House Committee on Agriculture

  • Subcommittee on Biotechnology, Horticulture, and Research
  • Subcommittee on Conservation and Forestry

Caucuses 

  • Agriculture and Rural America Taskforce
  • Arts Caucus (co-chair)
  • Bicameral Task Force on Climate Change
  • Bicycle Caucus
  • Biomass Caucus
  • Business Owners Caucus
  • Childhood Cancer Caucus
  • Coast Guard Caucus
  • Congressional Coalition on Adoption
  • Cut Flower Caucus
  • Cystic Fibrosis Caucus
  • Dairy Farmer Caucus
  • Defense Communities Caucus
  • Diabetes Caucus
  • Food Waste Caucus (co-chair)
  • Friends of Ireland Caucus
  • General Aviation Caucus
  • Green Schools Caucus
  • High Speed Rail Caucus
  • Historic Preservation Caucus
  • House Oceans Caucus
  • House Trade Working Group
  • Humanities Caucus
  • Hunger Caucus
  • Invasive Species Caucus
  • LGBT Equality Caucus
  • Lyme Disease Caucus
  • Maternity Care Caucus
  • Medicaid Expansion Caucus
  • Military Depot & Industrial Facilities Caucus
  • Military Mental Health Caucus
  • Military Sexual Assault Protection Caucus
  • National Guard & Reserve Component Caucus
  • Native American Caucus
  • Neuroscience Caucus
  • Organic Caucus
  • Peace Corps Caucus
  • Philanthropy Caucus
  • Pollinator Protection Caucus
  • Ports Caucus
  • Primary Care Caucus
  • Pro Choice Caucus
  • Progressive Caucus
  • Rural Broadband Caucus
  • Rural Caucus
  • Rural Education Caucus
  • Semiconductor Caucus
  • Service Caucus
  • Shellfish Caucus
  • Ship Building Caucus
  • Small Brewers Caucus
  • Small Business Caucus (co-chair)
  • Sustainable Energy and Environment Coalition
  • Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission
  • TRIO Caucus
  • Wildlife Refuge Caucus
  • Wine Caucus
  • Women’s Caucus

Sponsored Legislation

CONGRESS.GOV 

Offices

Washington, DC Office2162 Rayburn HOB
Washington, DC 20515
Phone (202) 225-6116
Fax (202) 225-5590
 
Portland Office2 Portland Fish Pier, Suite 304
Portland, ME 04101
Phone (207) 774-5019
Toll Free 1-888-862-6500
Fax (207) 871-0720
 
Waterville Office1 Silver Street
Waterville, ME 04901
Phone (207) 873-5713
Toll Free 1-888-862-6500
Fax (207) 873-5717

 

Experience

Education

Contact

Email:

Offices

Office Locations Portland Office
2 Portland Fish Pier, Suite 304
Portland, ME 04101
Phone: (207) 774-5019

Waterville Office
1 Silver Street
Waterville, ME 04901
Phone: (207) 873-5713

Washington, DC Office
2162 Rayburn House Office Building
Washington DC 20515
Phone: (202) 225-6116

Web

Government Page, Twitter, YouTube, Facebook

Politics

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Campaign Finance

Open Secrets

Voting Record

Vote Smart

Search

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Wikipedia Entry

Chellie Marie Pingree (/ˈʃɛli ˈpɪŋɡr/ SHELL-ee PING-gree; née Johnson; born April 2, 1955) is an American politician serving as the U.S. Representative for Maine’s 1st congressional district since 2009.[1] A member of the Democratic Party, her district includes most of the southern part of the state, including Portland and Augusta.

Pingree was a member of the Maine Senate from 1992 to 2000, serving as majority leader for her last four years. She was an unsuccessful candidate for the United States Senate in 2002, losing to incumbent Republican Susan Collins. From 2003 until 2006, she was president and CEO of Common Cause. She is the first Democratic woman elected to the U.S. House of Representatives from Maine.

Early life, education, and early career

Pingree was born Rochelle Marie Johnson, in Minneapolis, Minnesota, the daughter of Harry and Dorothy Johnson. She moved to Maine as a teenager and had her first name legally changed to Chellie. She attended the University of Southern Maine and graduated from College of the Atlantic with a degree in Human Ecology. Since graduating from College of the Atlantic, she has resided on North Haven, a small island community off the coast of Rockland.

Pingree held various farming and care-taking jobs until 1981, when she started North Island Yarn, a cottage industry of hand knitters with a retail store on North Haven. Her business expanded and became North Island Designs, employing as many as ten workers. They began marketing knitting kits and pattern books nationwide through 1,200 retail stores and 100,000 mail-order catalogues. Through North Island Designs, Pingree authored and produced five knitting books between 1986 and 1992. Eisenhower Fellowships selected Chellie Pingree as a USA Eisenhower Fellow in 1997.[1]

Common Cause

As the leader of Common Cause, Pingree was active in the organization’s programs in media reform, and elections, ethics, and money in politics. She supported net neutrality, mandatory voter-verified paper ballots, public financing of congressional elections, national popular vote (a work-around of the
Electoral College), and an independent ethics commission for Congress. She stepped down from Common Cause in February 2007 to return to her home state and run for Congress in 2008.[2]

Maine Senate

Elections

Pingree was first elected in 1992.[3] She was outspoken against going to war against Iraq,[4] although counseled by party insiders to avoid that subject. She won re-election in 1994[5] and 1996. In 2000, she was unable to seek re-election due to term limits.[6]

Tenure

Pingree served as the Senate Majority Leader in the Maine Senate representing Knox County. She was elected Maine’s second female Senate Majority Leader on December 4, 1996.

During her tenure as a state legislator, Pingree gained nationwide headlines when she authored the nation’s first bill regulating prescription drug prices, Maine Rx.[7] Pingree also shepherded Maine’s largest land-bill initiative, Land for Maine’s Future.[8]

2002 run for U.S. Senate

In 2002, Pingree made an unsuccessful bid for the U.S. Senate seat held by Republican junior U.S. Senator Susan Collins. Collins, a popular moderate incumbent, won by a margin of 17%.[9]

U.S. House of Representatives

Pingree during the 111th Congress

Elections

2008

In April 2007, Pingree filed papers for her bid to run for Maine’s 1st congressional district.[10]

On August 15, 2007, EMILY’s List endorsed Pingree’s campaign for Congress in Maine’s 1st district.[11][12] In December 2007 she received the endorsement of 21st Century Democrats.[13] She was endorsed by a number of labor organizations and many individuals and state officials, including Congressman Rush D. Holt, Jr.; Congresswoman Jan Schakowsky; Maine Senate Majority Leader Libby Mitchell; former Maine Senate Assistant Majority Leader Anne Rand; State Representative Paulette Beaudoin; progressive writer and activist Jim Hightower; the United Auto Workers; Planned Parenthood, and the League of Conservation Voters.[14]

Pingree was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives on November 4, 2008. She was sworn in to Congress on January 6, 2009.[15]

2010

In 2010, she ran for reelection, and won, defeating Republican challenger Dean Scontras by a 57–43 margin. She overcame strong anti-Democrat and anti-incumbent political sentiment to become just one of eight Democrats in the House of Representatives to receive a higher percentage of the vote than in 2008.[citation needed]

2012

On February 29, 2012, an Associated Press story mentioned that Pingree was starting to circulate petitions to run for the U.S. Senate seat vacated by the retirement of Olympia Snowe, which she confirmed on The Rachel Maddow Show later that night.[16] She withdrew her name from the race on March 7 and ran for re-election to the U.S. House of Representatives.[17]

2016

In 2016, Pingree defeated Republican challenger Mark Holbrook by around 16 points.[18]

2018

In late 2017, Pingree’s name was mentioned as a potential Democratic candidate for governor of Maine, to succeed term-limited incumbent Paul Lepage. In mid-December, she announced plans to run for re-election to the House.[19] Pingree again faced Holbrook in the 2018 general election.[20] The race was not considered competitive, and she defeated Holbrook by around 26 points.[21]

2020

Pingree was re-elected in 2020.[22]

Tenure

Soon after her election, she joined the Congressional Progressive Caucus, of which she is now vice-chairwoman. In September 2010, a video surfaced on the internet showing Pingree at Portland International Jetport disembarking from a private jet owned by her then-fiancé, hedge fund manager S. Donald Sussman. This drew criticism due to past statements made by Pingree critical of legislators using private aircraft. Pingree declined to respond.[23][24] The House Ethics Committee, in a bipartisan letter, stated the travel was permissible under House ethics rules.[25]

Pingree announced on April 26, 2013, that she would not run for Governor of Maine in the 2014 election. She stated that she was “happy” to serve in the House, and that the possibility of a three-way race also factored in to her decision.[26]

Legislation sponsored

On May 23, 2013, Pingree introduced in the United States House of Representatives the York River Wild and Scenic River Study Act of 2013 (H.R. 2197; 113th Congress). If passed, the bill would require the National Park Service (NPS) to study a segment of the York River in the state of Maine for potential addition to the Wild and Scenic Rivers System.[27] The study would be to determine how the proposed designation would affect current recreational and commercial activities.[28] The study would cost approximately $500,000.[29]

Committee assignments

Past

Caucus memberships

Political positions

Pingree is opposed to granting the president fast track authority in negotiating trade agreements, having voted against doing so on June 12, 2015. Pingree stated that such agreements needed more transparency and debate, not less.[35]

Pingree helped draft the Fair Elections Now Act, a proposal to provide public ‘Fair Elections’ funding for popular candidates who raised a sufficient number of small local contributions.[36] Pingree has spoken out against the 2011 Supreme Court ruling McComish v. Bennett which limited public financing systems for congressional candidate campaigns.[36]

Pingree has consistently voted against resolutions promoting aggressive foreign policy.[37] Pingree voted “yea” in March 2011 on a resolution to remove forces from Afghanistan. In June 2011, Pingree voted “yea” on House Resolution 292, preventing President Barack Obama from deploying ground forces in Libya.[37]

In 2017, Pingree did not attend the inauguration of Donald Trump and instead visited a Planned Parenthood center and a business owned by immigrants. She attended the 2017 Women’s March the following day and stood on stage with other politicians who had also refused to attend the inauguration.[38] In July 2019, Pingree joined 95 Democrats voting for an impeachment resolution against Trump. Maine representative Jared Golden and 136 other Democrats joined with their Republican colleagues to kill the resolution.[39]

In July 2019, Pingree voted against H. Res. 246 – 116th Congress, a House Resolution introduced by Congressman Brad Schneider (D-IL) opposing efforts to boycott the State of Israel and the Global Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions Movement targeting Israel.[40] The resolution passed 398-17.[41]

On December 18, 2019, Pingree voted to impeach President Donald J. Trump from office.[42]

Electoral history

YearOfficeCandidatePartyVotes%OpponentPartyVotes%OpponentPartyVotes%
2008[43]Maine’s
1st
congressional
district
Chellie PingreeDemocratic205,62954.90%Charlie SummersRepublican168,93045.10%
2010[44]Democratic169,11456.82%Dean ScontrasRepublican128,50143.17%OtherOther420.01%
2012[45]Democratic236,36364.79%Jonathan CourtneyRepublican128,44035.21%
2014[46]Democratic186,30960.3%Isaac MisiukRepublican94,84730.7%Richard MurphyOther27,6699.0%
2016[47]Democratic227,54657.9%Mark HolbrookRepublican164,56942.1%James BouchardLibertarian14,5513.6%
2018[48]Democratic198,85358.8%Mark HolbrookRepublican109,71432.4%Martin GrohmanIndependent29,5698.7%
2008 U.S. House Democratic primary, 1st district of Maine
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Chellie Pingree 24,324 43.9
DemocraticAdam Cote15,70628.3
DemocraticMichael Brennan6,04010.9
DemocraticEthan Strimling5,83310.5
DemocraticMark Lawrence2,7264.9
DemocraticSteve Meister7531.3
Total votes55,382 100
Maine U.S. Senate Election 2002
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
RepublicanSusan Collins (incumbent)299,26658.4
DemocraticChellie Pingree205,90141.6

Personal life

Pingree has three children; the oldest, Hannah Pingree, is the ex-Speaker of the Maine House of Representatives. On June 18, 2011, Pingree married S. Donald Sussman, a hedge fund manager,[26] in a private ceremony at the couple’s home in North Haven, Maine.[49]

Until June 1, 2015, Sussman owned a 75%[50] stake in MaineToday Media, the owners of the Portland Press Herald, Kennebec Journal, and Morning Sentinel, in addition to sitting on the board of directors.[51] Articles in those papers that discussed Pingree carried a disclaimer noting her marriage to Sussman.[26][52]

Sussman completed the sale of his stake in MaineToday Media on June 1.[53]

Pingree released a statement on September 8, 2015, announcing her separation and beginning of divorce proceedings from Sussman. She called it an “amicable and truly mutual decision”. The two divorced in the summer of 2016.[54]

Pingree is a co-owner, along with her daughter Hannah, of the Nebo Lodge Inn & Restaurant on Maine’s North Haven Island.[55]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b “About Chellie”. Archived from the original on 23 October 2014. Retrieved 24 October 2014.
  2. ^ Griffin, Walter (October 3, 2008). “Chellie Pingree: Maine island living shapes longtime politician’s views”. Bangor Daily News.
  3. ^ https://awpc.cattcenter.iastate.edu/directory/chellie-m-pingree/
  4. ^ https://www.peaceaction.org/legislator/chellie-pingree/
  5. ^ Kyle, Bruce (November 10, 1994). “Hard wins, tough defeats for parties in Knox County”. Bangor Daily News.
  6. ^ https://pingree.house.gov/about/
  7. ^ Phinney, David (April 17, 2002). “House cancels Pingree’s talk on Rx program”. Bangor Daily News. Archived from the original on 10 June 2016. Retrieved 9 May 2016.
  8. ^ “U.S. Rep. Chellie Pingree Fighting for Change in Washington DC”. Archived from the original on 2013-06-12. Retrieved 2013-03-10.
  9. ^ “2002 ELECTION STATISTICS”. house.gov. Retrieved 12 September 2015.
  10. ^ Announcement to run for Congress Boston Globe, April 6, 2007; accessed 2008-03-05
  11. ^ EMILY’s List Announces Endorsement of Chellie Pingree for Maine 1st District EMILY’S List, press release Accessed 2008-03-05
  12. ^ Chellie Pingree U.S. House, ME Archived 2008-07-26 at the Wayback Machine, emilyslist.org; accessed February 15, 2017.
  13. ^ Pingree Announces Endorsements Archived 2008-02-22 at the Wayback Machine December 20, 2007; accessed 2008-03-05
  14. ^ Complete list of endorsements Archived 2008-01-25 at the Wayback Machine, ChelliePingree.com; accessed 2008-03-05.
  15. ^ “New Faces of Congress: The House”, New York Times; accessed January 9, 2009.
  16. ^ “Sen. Snowe’s Retirement Causes Maine Scramble”. The New York Times. February 29, 2012.
  17. ^ Livingston, Abby (March 7, 2012). “Maine: Chellie Pingree Passes on Senate Bid”. Roll Call.
  18. ^ “Maine’s 1st Congressional District election, 2016”. Ballotpedia. Retrieved 18 July 2018.
  19. ^ “Pingree says she won’t run for governor in 2018”. Bangor Daily News. Retrieved 18 July 2018.
  20. ^ “Maine primary election results 2018: Governor, Senate and House races”. Washington Post. Retrieved 18 July 2018.
  21. ^ “Maine’s 1st Congressional District election, 2016”. Ballotpedia. Retrieved 30 January 2019.
  22. ^ Ohm, Rachel (2020-11-04). “Pingree declares victory in Maine’s 1st Congressional District”. Press Herald. Retrieved 2020-11-05.
  23. ^ Russell, Eric (2010-09-24). “Pingree takes heat for rides on fiance’s plane”. Bangor Daily News. Archived from the original on 2012-07-20. Retrieved 2010-09-27.
  24. ^ “Congresswoman Pingree’s Travel Record Criticized”. WPFO. 2010-09-24. Archived from the original on 2010-09-26. Retrieved 2010-09-27.
  25. ^ Staff (2010-09-28). “Maine Rep. Chellie Pingree’s jet travel cleared by ethics panel”. Retrieved 2010-09-30.
  26. ^ a b c Kevin Miller (2013-04-27). “Chellie Pingree says she won’t run for Maine governorl”. Kennebec Journal. Retrieved 2013-04-27.
  27. ^ “CBO – H.R. 2197”. Congressional Budget Office. Retrieved 3 March 2014.
  28. ^ “H.R. 2197 – Summary”. United States Congress. Retrieved 3 March 2014.
  29. ^ McDermott, Deborah (30 January 2013). “Renewed effort aims to designate York River ‘Wild and Scenic. Seacoast Online. Retrieved 4 March 2014.
  30. ^ “Caucus Members”. Congressional Progressive Caucus. Retrieved 30 January 2018.
  31. ^ “Membership”. Congressional Arts Caucus. Archived from the original on 12 June 2018. Retrieved 13 March 2018.
  32. ^ “Members”. Afterschool Alliance. Retrieved 18 April 2018.
  33. ^ Twitter Member list
  34. ^ “Our Members”. U.S. House of Representatives International Conservation Caucus. Archived from the original on 1 August 2018. Retrieved 5 August 2018.
  35. ^ “Pingree, Poliquin block Obama’s desired fast-track on trade deal”. Bangor Daily News. 2015-06-12. Retrieved 2015-06-12.
  36. ^ a b Pingree, Chellie (June 27, 2011). “Congress needs Fair Elections Now”. The Hill.
  37. ^ a b “Chellie Pingree: Key Votes”. Project Vote Smart. Retrieved March 8, 2012.
  38. ^ Walters, Joanna (January 20, 2017). “Women’s March organizers prepare for hundreds of thousands of protesters”. The Guardian. Retrieved January 23, 2017.
  39. ^ “House votes to kill impeachment resolution against Trump”. The Washington Post. Retrieved August 3, 2019.
  40. ^ Clare Foran. “Who voted ‘no’ on the House resolution opposing Israel boycott movement”. CNN. Retrieved 2019-07-25.
  41. ^ Schneider, Bradley Scott (2019-07-23). “H.Res.246 – 116th Congress (2019-2020): Opposing efforts to delegitimize the State of Israel and the Global Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions Movement targeting Israel”. www.congress.gov. Retrieved 2019-07-25.
  42. ^ Panetta, Grace. “WHIP COUNT: Here’s which members of the House voted for and against impeaching Trump”. Business Insider. Retrieved 2020-01-21.
  43. ^ “ME – District 1 Race – Nov 04, 2008”. Our Campaigns. Retrieved 22 March 2013.
  44. ^ “ME – District 1 Race – Nov 02, 2010”. Our Campaigns. Retrieved 22 March 2013.
  45. ^ “ME – District 1 Race- Nov 06, 2012”. Our Campaigns. Retrieved 22 March 2013.
  46. ^ “Maine Election Results 2014”. The New York Times. Retrieved 4 January 2016.
  47. ^ “2016 Maine House Election Results”. Politico. Retrieved 15 November 2018.
  48. ^ “Maine Election Results: First House District”. The New York Times. Retrieved 15 November 2018.
  49. ^ Riskind, Jonathan. “Pingree, Sussman wed”. Portland Press Herald. Retrieved June 20, 2011.
  50. ^ “Sussman-owned group acquires 75 percent share of MaineToday Media”. Bangor Daily News. March 27, 2012. Retrieved Jan 2, 2020.
  51. ^ “Chellie Pingree’s husband gives boost to MaineToday Media”. Bangor Daily News. February 10, 2012. Retrieved May 18, 2014.
  52. ^ “Pingree’s letter to federal regulators protests Comcast, Time Warner merger – The Portland Press Herald/Maine Sunday Telegram”. The Portland Press Herald/Maine Sunday Telegram. Retrieved September 12, 2015.
  53. ^ “Midcoast owner completes purchase of MaineToday newspapers”. Bangor Daily News. June 1, 2015. Retrieved June 2, 2015.
  54. ^ “Maine Democrats find help elsewhere after megadonor’s exit”. Portland Press Herald. Retrieved November 16, 2016.
  55. ^ Sekules, Kate. “Maine Vacation: An Amazing Ultra-Locavore Lodge”. Food & Wine Magazine. Retrieved May 6, 2013.

Sources

  • Wright, Virginia. “Maine’s Newest Political Dynasty”. Down East: The Magazine of Maine (January 2009).

External links

Party political offices
Preceded by

Democratic nominee for U.S. Senator from Maine
(Class 2)

2002
Succeeded by

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by

Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Maine’s 1st congressional district

2009–present
Incumbent
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by

United States representatives by seniority
114th
Succeeded by

Recent Elections

2016 US Representative

Chellie Pingree (D)227,54658%
Mark Holbrook (R)164,56941.9%
TOTAL392,115

Source: Ballotpedia

Finances

PINGREE, ROCHELLE M (CHELLIE) has run in 8 races for public office, winning 7 of them. The candidate has raised a total of $4,402,161.

Source: Follow the Money

Committees

Committees

Committee on Agriculture
Committee on Appropriations

Voting Record

See: Vote Smart

Issues

Source: Government page

Economy

Jobs and Economic Development

Investing in Our Infrastructure
Maine needs a strong infrastructure to compete on a national and global scale. I’ve been a strong supporter of fixing our infrastructure while expanding our technology, like bringing broadband Internet to rural areas of the state. I also believe we need a strong transportation network, which is why I have supported extending the Downeaster line to Brunswick and expanding options for alternative transportation.

Supporting Small Businesses
Small businesses truly are the backbone of Maine’s economy and one thing I hear most from them is the need for capital. As a small business owner myself, I couldn’t agree more. That’s why I’ve supported expanding Small Business Administration loan programs, cutting unnecessary regulations, and have worked to connect our small businesses with larger federal contractors.

Strengthening the Creative Economy
The arts aren’t just entertainment–they’re being used in Maine to drive economic activity and bring people back into our downtowns. Learn more about my work to advocate for federal support for the arts here.

Bath Iron Works and Portsmouth Naval Shipyard
Shipbuilding is in Maine’s blood, and it represents the livelihood of thousands of Mainers. Learn about my advocacy for Bath Iron Works here and Portsmouth Naval Shipyard here.

Brunswick Naval Air Station
The closing of Brunswick Naval Air Station marked the end of an era. But redevelopment of the site has presented an excellent opportunity to create new jobs for the area. I helped the local redevelopment authority acquire the site for no cost from the Navy, and have been happy to see new businesses use the facilities, including Resilient Communications, Molnlycke Health Care, the Brunswick Executive Airport, and a new campus of Southern Maine Community College.

Clean Energy
Maine is working to become a leader in clean energy, including offshore wind power and tidal power. Learn more here.

Local Foods
I am strong supporter of Maine’s efforts to support local foods and local farms because there’s no need to buy food from across the globe or country when our neighbors are already producing fresh, healthy produce. As member of the House Agriculture Committee, I’m working for federal policy that better supports creation of these local jobs. Learn more here.

Working Waterfronts
Maine’s 20 miles of working waterfronts support 30,000 jobs, but are vulnerable to development. Communities need more resources to protect these critical places so generations of Mainers can continue making their living from the water. Learn more here.

Environment

Fighting Climate Change

Climate change is real, caused by human activity, and an urgent threat to our way of life. For too long, scientific warnings were ignored and now we’re at a crisis point. To avoid a major, irreversible catastrophe, we must take bold action to become carbon neutral by 2050.

In the 116th Congress, I’ve introduced three bills to protect our oceans and coastlines from the climate crisis and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. I’m proud that two of these bills (H.R. 1716 & H.R. 3596) have already passed the House and await action in the Senate. And as the Vice Chair of the House Appropriations Committee on Interior and Environment, I play a leading role in the fight against climate change in Congress by holding the Trump administration accountable on this issue. Additionally, I’ve cosponsored 57 bills introduced by my House colleagues to address the climate crisis —all outlined below.

This page was designed to keep you updated about the progress Congress is making to fight climate change—but this is just a starting point. Think I should add another bill to this list? Contact my office here.

Together, these bills take immediate and comprehensive action to combat and mitigate the climate crisis.

Health Care

Health Care

Keep up to date on my efforts to protect and improve on affordable health care gains for the American people.

Social Security

Supporting Seniors

Medicare and Social Security work to keep thousands of Mainers out of poverty. But they’ve become targets for those who’d rather cut benefits than having the wealthiest Americans pay their fair share. We need to protect these critical benefits and make sure they are there for the next generation.

Don’t Touch Medicare
For 60 years, Medicare has given millions of seniors the health care they need and kept them out of poverty. It’s a benefit our seniors have worked hard to earn. Still, some see it as a way to balance a deficit that our seniors to cause. I’m against any cutting for Medicare benefits and medical care for our retirees and I vow to fight any proposals to do so.

Strengthening Social Security
Social Security is another important benefit that seniors worked hard to earn. But some want to change the program by scaring people into thinking it won’t be around for the future. That’s simply not true. There are ways to strengthen Social Security without cutting benefits.

Veterans

Veterans Issues

I believe that we have a moral obligation to our nation’s veterans, whether they’ve served for 3 years or for 30. Through my seat on the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Military Construction and Veterans Affairs, I will work to ensure the Department of Veterans Affairs is adequately funded to provide veterans with the benefits they are entitled to and that bureaucracy does not lead to the wrongful denial of benefits.

I am honored to represent Maine’s current and former military members in Congress.

Food and Agriculture

On both the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Agriculture and the House Agriculture Committee, longtime organic farmer Congresswoman Chellie Pingree is fighting for a food system that works better for farmers, consumers, and the environment. Her work on the issue has earned her national praise, but the real wins have been the successful reforms she made in the 2014 and 2018 Farm Bills. Stay tuned to this page for updates on all issues food and agriculture.

Fisheries

Fisheries are an incredibly important issue for Maine. From fighting to ensure our fishermen have access to working waterfronts to supporting the scientific research and stock assessments necessary to ensure the accurate setting of quotas, I am working in Maine and DC to make our fisheries and coastal communities more sustainable.

Protecting Working Waterfronts

It’s hard to imagine a place like Maine without its working waterfronts. They’re not only an iconic part of our state’s history and landscape, but an irreplaceable resource for 30,000 thousand Mainers who make their living from marine-related industries.

But as valuable as they are to our communities, they make up only 20 miles of our 3,300-mile coastline. That makes them extremely vulnerable, since a development here or a few condos there can swallow a large percentage of what working land remains.  Other emerging threats include climate change and ocean acidification.

We need tools to protect these valuable spots and ensure that Mainers can continue to make their living from the sea.

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